April 2015 Archives

The justices appeared sharply divided Tuesday over whether states must license same-sex marriages, with lengthy arguments often focusing on the effect of state policies on children.


The retired U.S. Supreme Court justice was lauded for founding iCivics, a program of online educational games to teach about government.


The justices declined to take a case involving allegations that a Pennsylvania district funneled a disproportionate number of African-American students into special education.


The district's use of yoga in its physical education classes does not impermissibly advance religion, despite yoga's roots in Hinduism, the state court rules.


Two school employees have no right of privacy against the disclosure that they are under investigation, Washington state's highest court has ruled.


The justices in 1985 heard arguments about an Oklahoma law that barred speech by teachers "advocating, encouraging, or promoting" homosexuality.


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