A federal appeals court has ruled against a Washington teacher who contends he was dismissed in retaliation for blowing the whistle on alleged test tampering.


The divided ruling sets the stage for the closely watched affirmative action case to return to the U.S. Supreme Court.


The court threw out the conviction of a high school student who had posted photographs on Facebook with vulgar descriptions of his classmates.


The justices rule in a case that was being closely watched by the teachers' unions because it challenged a key precedent on public-employee collective bargaining.


The 11th Circuit court revives the lawsuit filed by a Clayton County, Ga., educator who lost his job over a comment he made while serving as the state president of the teachers' association.


In a case with implications for students, school administrators, and police in schools, the justices unanimously held that a police search of an arrestee's cellphone requires a warrant.


The Environmental Protection Agency will not be regulating schools over the emission of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide anytime soon under the ruling.


The U.S. Supreme Court gave public employees such as teachers and administrators stronger First Amendment speech protections when they testify under oath.


In a case with potential implications for schools, the justices agreed to weigh the free speech rights of those who make threats or deliver violent rants on social media such as Facebook.


Over a strong dissent by two justices, the U.S. Supreme Court declined to consider whether a school district's use of a Christian church for its high school graduation ceremonies was constitutional.


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