The Juneau, Alaska, school district has reached a settlement with former student Joseph Frederick, who was disciplined over his 2002 display of a banner that said "Bong Hits 4 Jesus," according to this story in the Juneau Empire. This struck me as interesting, because the district and a school principal won their case in the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled last year in Morse v. Frederick that the 'Bong Hits' banner was not protected speech and that the principal merited qualified immunity for disciplining the student. But a seven-year litigation saga was continuing, evidently with the possibility that Frederick ...


The U.S. Supreme Court today took up a major case about indecency on broadcast television, with the Bush administration arguing in support of government regulation of the fleeting use of expletives over the airwaves in the name of protecting children. "Most Americans still get their information and entertainment from broadcast TV," said U.S. Solicitor General Gregory G. Garre, who was representing the government in Federal Communications Commission v. Fox Television Stations Inc. (Case No. 07-582). "Broadcast TV is extremely accessible to children because all they have to do is turn it on. ... And broadcast television is still broadcast ...


The U.S. Supreme Court today took up a teachers' union case that even several justices said left them befuddled. At issue in Ysursa v. Pocatello Education Assocation (Case No. 07-869) is an Idaho law that prohibits school districts and other local governments from using their payroll systems to let workers deduct amounts from their paychecks for political causes, such as for teachers' unions' political action funds. The Idaho Education Association, its Pocatello affiliate, and several other public-employee unions in the state challenged the law as an infringement of their First Amendment rights of free speech and association. The restriction ...


This decision is a couple of weeks old but I just came across it, and it is an interesting intersection of state and federal anti-discrimination law. A state appeals court in California has upheld jury awards of $175,000 and $125,000 to two students who suffered anti-gay harassment from their peers at school. The court said the Poway Unified School District violated the students' rights under a state anti-discrimination law because of its insufficient response to the harassment. The court also upheld findings that the principal and assistant principal at Poway High School violated one student-plaintiff's federal constitutional right ...


A couple of quick items for a Friday afternoon: Disability Guidance: My colleague Christina Samuels has this story in Education Week about informal guidance from the U.S. Department of Education on when it is proper for schools to refer to a student's disability status on report cards and transcripts. The simple answer is that it is OK under certain circumstances to note a student's disability status on a report card, but it usually isn't OK on a transcript. The Education Department's office for civil rights issued this "dear colleague" letter, as well as this question-and-answer document. Desegregation in Tucson: ...


A couple of interesting decisions from recent weeks on free speech for school employees and students have just crossed my desk. Employee Speech: A federal appeals court has revived the lawsuit of an Idaho school security specialist who claims he lost his job in retaliation for raising concerns with administrators about school discipline and safety. A three-juge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit, in San Francisco, ruled unanimously on Oct. 15 in Posey v. Lake Pend Oreille School District that under a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision on speech by public employees, a ...


A federal district judge has ruled that a New York City school system rule barring teachers from wearing campaign buttons in school is likely constitutional. In an Oct. 17 opinion, Judge Lewis A. Kaplan of U.S. District Court in Manhattan rejected a request by the United Federation of Teachers for a preliminary injunction that would bar enforcement of the "chancellor's regulation" against wearing political buttons. "While a majority of students, particularly older students, presumably would understand that the views expressed by their teachers’ campaign buttons are personal rather than institutional," Judge Kaplan said, "there is a clear relationship between ...


The U.S. Supreme Court today refused to hear the appeal of a Minnesota family in a case about the burden of proof in legal disputes over special education. The appeal in M.M. v. Special School District No. 1, Minneapolis, comes from the parent of a child with multiple disabilities who ended up in administrative proceedings over the child's services under the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. At issue is whether the parent or the state of Minnesota would have the burden of proof in the proceedings. In a 2005 opinion known as Schafferv. Weast, the Supreme Court ...


The following story appears in the next edition of Education Week. It is based on an Oct. 15 forum sponsored by the American Enterprise Institute and the Thomas B. Fordham Institute. The conference lineup and draft papers are available here. Scholars Weigh Court Influence Over School Practices, Climate By Mark Walsh Washington The courts play a big part in many aspects of public education in the United States, but it wasn’t always that way. And was the situation inevitable? That was one question that a group of legal scholars, education policy experts, and a few practitioners sought to answer ...


What do public school principals and teachers share in common with the average police officer on the street? The answer is an interest in the body of law concerning official immunity from liability in lawsuits that challenge their actions. The police are sometimes sued personally by criminals or suspects over charges of the alleged deprivation of constitutional rights. Educators are sued by students and their parents over a whole range of actions. Under the U.S. Supreme Court’s precedents on so-called qualified immunity, such government officials are immune from suit unless they violated clearly established statutory or constitutional rights ...


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