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Michelle Rhee's Olympic-Themed StudentsFirst Ad Rankles Educators

StudentsFirst, the education advocacy group founded by former D.C. Schools Chancellor Michelle Rhee, unveiled an advertisement this weekend that's been drawing criticism from educators ever since, reported my colleague Liana Heitin on EdWeekTeacher's Teaching Now blog yesterday.

The ad, which you can watch below, features an overweight man in a "USA EDU" shirt flailing while attempting a gymnastics routine. The accompanying commentary includes quotes such as, "It appears the once-proud U.S. program has been relying too much on its reputation," and, "Wow. This is an embarrassment," referencing how far the United States has fallen in terms of global academic achievement.

By the time Rhee went on Meet the Press Sunday to preview the video, blogger Gary Rubinstein had already posted a critique of the ad, which has been making its way around social networks the past few days.

As you'll see, Rubinstein wasn't the only educator to take issue with the video. Here's a sampling of some other disgruntled educators' opinions taken from recent Twitter postings:

EdWeekTeacher blogger Anthony Cody also voiced his displeasure with the video as a comment on Liana's blog post, calling the ad "insulting to our schools, and to our intelligence."

To StudentFirst's credit, not all of the feedback on Twitter was negative. At least two Twitter users sang the praises of the ad, with one calling it funny.

Did I mention that both of those Twitter users appear to be affiliated with StudentsFirst?

Based on my Twitter search, the overall sentiment from the non-StudentsFirst community appeared to trend toward the negative side, to say the least.

Want all the latest K-12 sports news? Follow @SchooledinSport on Twitter.

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