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Researchers Draw Link Between Physical Activity, Academic Success

Beyond the fitness-related benefits, physical activity can also contribute to students' academic success, suggests a consensus statement published online Monday in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

A group of 24 international experts gathered in Denmark back in April "to reach evidence-based consensus about physical activity and youth." They wound up with a 21-point list divided into four themes: fitness and health; cognitive functioning; engagement, motivation, psychological well-being; and inclusion and physical activity implementation strategies.

When it comes to academics, the researchers concluded that "physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness are beneficial to brain structure, brain function, and cognition in children and youth." Additionally, they suggested "a single session of moderate physical activity has an acute benefit to brain function, cognition, and scholastic performance in children and youth."

There's been plenty of research in recent years to back up these assertions. In September 2014, a study published in the journal PLOS ONE found physical activity during recess in 1st grade to be directly correlated to reading fluency in 1st and 2nd grades. A study published in the same journal the previous September suggested higher levels of aerobic fitness could bolster a child's ability to learn and remember information. In March 2014, a study found Kansas elementary and middle school students who met certain physical-fitness benchmarks to be considerably more likely to exceed reading and math performance standards.

Accordingly, the Copenhagen Consensus experts concluded that time taken away from academic lessons in favor of physical activity won't "come at the cost of scholastic performance." Research suggests there's a tangible academic benefit to giving students a physical-activity break between hours of lessons, even if it comes at the expense of a few extra minutes of classroom time.

The Copenhagen researchers also found physical activity to have "the potential to positively influence psychological and social outcomes" for students, "such as self-esteem and relationships with peers, parents, and coaches." They suggested "close relationships and peer group acceptance in physical activity are positively related to perceived competence, intrinsic motivation and participation behavior" in children. The experts particularly endorsed physical-activity programs with "an intentional curriculum and deliberate training," as they are "effective at promoting life skills and core values" such as respect, social responsibility and self-regulation.

The consensus statement authors highlighted schools as a major asset when it comes to physical activity, as socioeconomic factors may limit some children's activity opportunities outside of school hours. Having bike lanes, parks, and playgrounds at schools "are both effective strategies for providing equitable access to, and enhancing physical activity for, children and youth," they concluded.


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