October 2012 Archives

The Early Start Denver Model also has been shown to decrease autism symptoms and improve social skills.


About eight in 10 students with disabilities get the right number of sessions of services they need, but only seven in 10 get those services for the amount of time their educational plans say they should.


Too often, these students "literally languish in our schools," write Paula Olszewski-Kubilius, president of the National Association for Gifted Children, and director of public education Jane Clarenbach in "Unlocking Emergent Talent: Supporting High Achievement of Low-Income, High-Ability Students."


With school reform efforts combining with federal incentives to encourage more districts and states to change how they evaluate teachers, the Council for Exceptional Children shares its views on evaluating special education teachers.


When reviewing some states' waiver applications, the Alliance for Excellent Education found that several of those approved inflate grad rates by combining calculations of the graduation rate that include GEDs with the four-year adjusted cohort rate, use alternative diplomas in their measure of high school completion, omit graduation rate accountability for student subgroups, and use extended-year graduation rates.


In what may be a first-of-its-kind penalty, the feds used a provision in federal law that allows cutting a state's federal special education grant, permanently, if the state cut its special education budget without the right justification.


The automatic cuts, set to kick in on Jan. 2, stem from Congress' disagreement over raising the federal debt ceiling.


The American Speech-Language Hearing Association unveils some guidelines for districts and schools seeking to evaluate speech-language pathologists.


In the ruling, Judge Harold Baer specifically cited the benefits that digital content has for people with print disabilities. Meanwhile, Netflix agreed to provide closed captioning on 100 percent of its streaming content within two years.


Children with learning disabilities, including dyslexia, make up 5 percent of all students. If those dyslexic students don't succeed, schools can't close the achievement gap between student with and without disabilities.


Parent complaints, teacher training, and accessibility are among the worries of the new Center on Online Learning and Students with Disabilities.


Until more research is done and interventions are developed to address this behavior, researchers hopes this study will inform families, doctors, educators and first responders who grapple with the consequences of elopement.


The greatest number of complaints were about whether students were receiving a free, appropriate public education.


The $25 million federal grant used to establish the center is one of many the federal Education Department has announced in recent weeks that involve special education.


The U.S. Department of Education's office for civil rights found that during the 2009-10 and 2010-11 school years, more than 60 percent of students with disabilities in the district were in self-contained classrooms.


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  • sdc teach: I agree with the previous post regarding the high cost read more
  • Jason: That alert is from 2001. Is there anything more recent read more
  • Vikki Mahaffy: I worked as a special education teacher for 18 years read more
  • paulina rickards: As it relates to this research I am in total read more
  • Anonymous: Fully fund the RTI process. We are providing special education read more