The panel tasked with creating rules to govern the Every Student Succeeds Act is hung up language in the law relating to testing students with severe cognitive disabilities.


Yudin, who has been with the U.S. Department of Education since 2010, did not say in an email to colleagues what he plans to do after leaving April 30.


The autism rate between 2010 and 2012 remained at 1 in 68 8-year-olds, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says, with differences among communities, races, and ethnicities.


Changes in the Every Student Succeeds Act will mean new regulations governing the testing of about 1 percent of students with severe cognitive disabilities.


A study finds that children who are younger than their grade-level peers more often are diagnosed with and medicated for ADHD. Here's some key takeaways.


Students will be allowed to use school records as evidence in cases where they are charged with acting "willfully or intentionally."


The California Department of Education will retain control of the student database, but plaintiffs in a case representing special education students will be able to request targeted searches of the information.


The Education Department says that states need tighter guidelines on how to assess districts for racial and ethnic bias in special education. But just how are states figuring out if minorities are being shunted inappropriately to special education classes?


The Los Angeles Unified School District has worked to move many students out of separate settings, such as dedicated special education schools, and into their neighborhood schools.


The L.A. school district says it has made major efforts to improve special education; a lawsuit involving Smith, now a mother of four, got the ball rolling.


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