Cross-posted from Rules for Engagement By Evie Blad Kentucky's highest education official sent cease and desist letters to the state's school districts last week, forbidding them from using Aikido, a form of Japanese martial arts, to restrain students. That's because the technique puts students in physical positions banned by state policy, the letter said. Education Commissioner Stephen Pruitt made his order in response to concerns that staff at about five school districts, including the Jefferson County school district, had been trained in or started using a technique called Aikido Control Training to physically restrain students, the Louisville Courier-Journal reported. Pruitt ...


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