A bipartisan group of congressional lawmakers introduce a bill that would dramatically increase the federal price tag for special education.


Intended for students who could not master grade-level content in one school year, these tests are on their way out, but they leave several lessons in their wake, says a recent analysis.


Allowing an unlimited number of students with disabilities to take alternate tests will place them in a lower academic track, argues the Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities.


Sara Wolff, who advocated on behalf of a newly-signed bill that allows people with disabilities to save money without risking federal benefits, was invited by Pennsylvania Senator Bob Casey.


Individualized education program teams have the authority to create alternate grade progression and graduation standards for some students with disabilities, but the policy is proving challenging to enact.


Private providers that offer special education services to preschool students are being scrutinized for potential fraud by the state's comptroller.


Annual testing has been able to help pinpoint how students with disabilities are actually performing in school, say groups opposed to removing the requirement from federal law.


Between 64 and 77 percent of students with disabilities scored at the lowest level on the tests, which are given in math and English/language arts.


Readers found posts on common standards and their implications for students with disabilities particularly compelling this year.


Zakiyyah McWilliams, the eighth special education administrator the district has had in the past five years, resigned prior to the release of the investigative report.


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