The federal Education Department's office for civil rights recently tried to clarify how school districts should uphold amendments to federal disability law. But one expert says the guidance is significant for what it doesn't say, not really what it does say.


Anthony Herrera could become ill if he takes high-stakes tests, his mother said, and he was discriminated against because he wouldn't take them. An investigation found he wasn't the victim of discrimination, but Anthony won't take the tests this year, anyway.


The state board of education banned the use of readers on some state tests, whether that means people or computer software that read text aloud, an accommodation used by some students with disabilities, who also use this kind of help in class every day.


The city failed to provide special education services to about 1 in 4 students entitled to them during the 2009-10 school year, and the city's most elite high schools need to admit more students with disabilities.


Parents and students with disabilities aren't as involved in the process of mapping out their goals with schools as much they should be, and schools could do more to make the process more welcoming.


Did San Diego's approach to inclusion move too fast, without enough required training for teachers and principals? Many parents and teachers say yes, and students with and without disabilities have suffered as a result.


The new version of the state's voucher program passed its first legal challenge, and lawmakers are considering expanding the program to make it available to all students.


Asperger syndrome and PDD-NOS would disappear as diagnoses and the autism spectrum would grow narrower under a new definition proposed by the American Psychiatric Association.


A new letter from the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights expands the definition of students for whom school districts' may have to provide special education services and accommodations, including some who in the past may have been found not to need those services.


The state legislature will consider a law restricting how students are restrained or secluded, a second attempt at such a law after a bill proposed in 2011 failed to pass.


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments