The U.S. Department of Education has issued new rules about how states and school districts should work with infants and toddlers with disabilities.


Audits of government agencies in Massachusetts that pool school district resources to provide services to students with disabilities have found these so-called collaboratives have allowed questionable spending on entertainment, staff salaries and benefits; been keepers of slush funds for member districts; and failed to provide licensed professionals to work with students with disabilities, among other problems.


While the school year hasn't quite started for thousands of students, many are in the throes of the school year. Some of the teachers and staff that work with students with disabilities will be learning along with their students, or already are.


How should schools work with a potentially growing number of students learning English who also have a disability?


Read a special report about how online and virtual classes are growing and changing to work with disabilities.


A former special education teacher with years of experience at the university level will take over as head of the National Center for Special Education Research.


The findings suggest increased awareness, outreach groups, and improvements in health care may be encouraging more low-income parents to have their children diagnosed.


In a survey of nearly 1,400 school- and district-level workers, 68 percent said they are either in full implementation or in the process of districtwide implementation.


A Colorado congressman is proposing cuts to defense spending to increase federal spending on students with disabilities.


A computer mouse for the foot? A system that keeps a wheelchair user from getting into an accident? A mobile signing math dictionaries with mouth morphemes? These futuristic-sounding creations are now closer to reality.


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