Change the No Child Left Behind law in the short and long terms could erase some of the progress the law has made for students with disabilities.


Wider use of cochlear implants has reshaped the teaching of students who are deaf and hard of hearing, but the training of teachers hasn't necessarily evolved along with the technology.


A bill that provides for $231 million in spending on autism research, keeping several programs already in action going, cleared one hurdle to its passage.


A federal committee wants more done to ensure children and adults subjected to restraints or seclusion are kept safe.


Six years after high school, students with disabilities are less likely to have gone on to postsecondary schools than their classmates without disabilities, less likely to have financial independence, but a little more likely to have children, according to a new study.


The U.S. Department of Education has issued new rules about how states and school districts should work with infants and toddlers with disabilities.


Audits of government agencies in Massachusetts that pool school district resources to provide services to students with disabilities have found these so-called collaboratives have allowed questionable spending on entertainment, staff salaries and benefits; been keepers of slush funds for member districts; and failed to provide licensed professionals to work with students with disabilities, among other problems.


While the school year hasn't quite started for thousands of students, many are in the throes of the school year. Some of the teachers and staff that work with students with disabilities will be learning along with their students, or already are.


How should schools work with a potentially growing number of students learning English who also have a disability?


Read a special report about how online and virtual classes are growing and changing to work with disabilities.


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