The reductions comes from a rule change at the state level.


Hello blog friends! After eight months away at a wonderful fellowship at the University of Michigan for mid-career journalists, I've returned to Education Week and I'm back on the special education beat. Thanks so much to Lisa Fine for taking good care of the blog while I was away! I followed many of my favorite special education bloggers while I was away, and I wanted to draw attention to this pointed entry by friend-of-the-blog Mark Miller at Special Needs Truth '08. Mark wrote about the District of Columbia's admission that the school system was fumbling in its efforts to remove ...


Why should there be outdated or offensive language in the very laws designed to protect the civil rights of individuals with disabilities? That's what some lawmakers are discussing on Capitol Hill this week. Senators are preparing to eliminate all references in federal law to the terms "mental retardation" and "mentally retarded individual," The Hill newspaper reports. New legislation, called Rosa's Law, would replace those terms with "intellectual disability" and "individual with an intellectual disability," the article says. The bill was introduced by Sen. Barbara Mikulski (D-Md.) last November after promising a constituent she would act if the Maryland legislature passed ...


The Chicago public schools this week announced a new leader for the special education department, as part of an overhaul of how students with disabilities are served in the district, according to the Chicago Tribune. On Monday, the district named Richard Smith as head of the office of specialized services, the Tribune reported. He will replace Deborah Duskey in the role. Smith, a former principal, most recently served as a chief area officer at the district overseeing special education schools. The Tribune said he will begin overhauling special education by enforcing a more collaborative attitude toward students and parents. Education ...


I wanted to point readers interested in autism to news of two new studies linking the use of infertility treatments to increased risk of autism in children, according to an article in the May 20 issue of Time Magazine. One study, conducted by a team at the Harvard School of Public Health, found that autism was nearly twice as common in the children of women treated with the ovulation-inducing drug called Clomid, or other similar drugs, than in women who did not receive fertility treatment. The study, presented Wednesday at the International Meeting for Autism Research in Philadelphia, said the ...


The Georgia Board of Education has proposed new rules about the use of restraint and seclusion in schools that could be approved as early as its July meeting. The proposed rules would prohibit the use of seclusion, chemical restraints such as prescription drugs, mechanical restraints, or prone restraints. Physical restraint would only be allowed in extreme situations when students are in imminent danger to themselves or others, according to the Georgia School Boards Association's Capitol Watch online. If the policy is approved, Georgia would no longer be one of the nearly 20 states that do not regulate seclusion and restraint ...


A study in Detroit showed that low-performing students have higher levels of lead than other students, the Detroit Free Press reported on Sunday. About 60 percent of Detroit Public Schools students who performed below their grade level on 2008 standardized tests had elevated lead levels, the story said, according to the study conducted by Detroit Public Schools and the city's Department of Health and Wellness Promotion. The study also showed that students in special education programs were also more likely to have blood tests results that showed elevated levels of lead. "For years, we've blamed the schools and the teachers ...


The Council for Exceptional Children, a professional association for special educators, is featuring on its website the inspiring stories of 27 students with disabilities who are this year's winners of the group's "Yes I Can!" awards. The students from around the country and Canada, who received their awards at a special ceremony at CEC's annual conference last month in Nashville, were selected for excellence in one of nine categories: academics, arts, athletics, community service, employment, extracurricular activities, independent living skills, self-advocacy, and technology. The website says thousands of children and youths have been recognized since the program's inception in 1982 ...


The May 1 issue of the medical journal Pediatrics renews its call for pediatricians to work with school nurses and personnel to help honor Do-Not-Attempt-Resuscitation requests for students. Over the years, children who have complex chronic medical conditions have been increasingly able to attend schools, putting school personnel in the position of possibly having to carry out the wishes of a family to forgo life-sustaining medical treatment, including CPR. Some families make that difficult choice if such treatment would be ineffective or because the risks outweigh the benefits, Pediatrics says. In 2000, the American Academy of Pediatrics first called for ...


Stanley I. Greenspan, a child psychiatrist who has written parenting books and developed the popular "floor time" technique for helping children with autism and other developmental disorders, died April 27 of complications from a stroke. He was 68, according to an article in The New York Times. Floor time, special time allotted for child-led play with an adult, is used in special education classrooms and as part of early-intervention therapy. With floor time, Dr. Greenspan encouraged parents or teachers to let children lead them in play to encourage the children to use gestures and words to express what they want ...


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments

  • sdc teach: I agree with the previous post regarding the high cost read more
  • Jason: That alert is from 2001. Is there anything more recent read more
  • Vikki Mahaffy: I worked as a special education teacher for 18 years read more
  • paulina rickards: As it relates to this research I am in total read more
  • Anonymous: Fully fund the RTI process. We are providing special education read more