Parents of students with profound disabilities are opposing a plan by a suburban Chicago school district to close a special school for those students and include them into general elementary school classrooms, according to the Chicago Sun-Times. The idea behind Evanston-Skokie District 65's inclusion plan is to make special education "a service, not a place," the article says. But these parents say they have tried inclusive arrangements and they don't work out well for their children, the article says. Schools around the nation have moved toward inclusion over the years with different levels of success, the article notes. What has ...


The Clark County district plans to build a school for highly gifted students in grades 6-12


Children covered by the program were given the drugs at a rate four times higher than for children with private insurance.


Bills introduced in the House and Senate follow a government report last spring finding misue of the practices.


Absences from class were the most important factor in explaining why students with disabilities fail more classes and have lower grades than their peers without identified disabilities in Chicago public schools, according to a new report by the Consortium on Chicago School Research. "Once we take into account the fact that students with disabilities miss many more days of school, their course failures and grades are similar to those of students without disabilities," says the report. Race, gender, socioeconomic status, age, and the types of schools students attend also explained part of the difference in academic performance. Self-reported study habits ...


Children who can keep up academically but not socially and emotionally pose a challenge for schools.


The risk was especially high among children exposed to both substances,the study found.


The approach was used to support struggling students in general education and to determine eligibility for special education services.


The administration must set a target range of special education students and help schools come closer to the range.


The recession is making public school gifted programs more attractive, the New York Times reports.


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments