September 2014 Archives

A Miami middle school principal discusses her respect for the standards, but says that state policies and a lack of resources have hampered her teachers' ability to prepare for new assessments.


The head of Florida House's K-12 appropriations subcommittee says that if Gov. Rick Scott wins reelection, big changes could be in store for how school funding works.


Half of Louisiana's public school teachers with one to five years of experience say they weren't adequately prepared for the realities of full-time teaching in their first year,


The retiring U.S. representative also says that politicians are attacking the standards largely to position themselves better for the 2016 presidential elections.


Supporters of Democratic nominee Charlie Crist for Florida governor are optimistic about his K-12 plans, but concede that he might not bring big changes in some areas if elected.


In the midst of a closely fought gubernatorial campaign, a survey of Florida residents reveals that they are placing increasing importance on the state's public school


A Missouri lawsuit claims that the state's funding of the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium illegally cedes state sovereignty over its K-12 policy.


Keen on hearing more about education in the Georgia governor's race? Listen to the two candidates stake out their turf on K-12 issues.


Federal education law, and competitive-grant initiatives from Washington, are catching quite a bit of heat from the two candidates seeking to be Georgia's next schools chief.


Missouri Commissioner of Education Chris Nicastro says she will resign at the end of the calendar year; meanwhile, Michael Martirano is sworn in as West Virginia's state schools superintendent.


When education comes up in the Georgia governor's race between incumbent Republican Nathan Deal and Democratic challenger Jason Carter, one theme is clear: money talks.


The Republican governor, who's in a close election fight with Democrat Jason Carter, wants state lawmakers to explore how to expand charter schools, and is looking to a fellow Republican governor for inspiration.


The Washington State Supreme Court has ruled that the state legislature is in contempt for failing to identify a long-term plan for substantially increasing public school funding.


Seven years after its "Leaders and Laggards" report took states to task over their K-12 policy, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce shows what it thinks of the K-12 landscape in 2014.


"It has become clear that now is not the time to further pursue the Teach Great initiative," a spokeswoman for the campaign said.


As widely expected, incumbent New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo defeated Democratic primary challenger and Fordham University law professor Zephyr Teachout on Sept. 9


What has all the state-level actvity related to the Common Core State Standards added up to? The Education Commission of the States has some answers.


A federal judge has ruled that a Utah law requiring the governor and a nominating committee to select which candidates can appear on the ballot for the state Board of Education is unconstitutional.


A former governor of Mississippi said that the number of districts that sued the state last month over K-12 state aid may grow in the coming days.


Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett releases a somewhat ambiguous statement about the future of the Common Core State Standards in the Keystone State.


What's the long-term fallout as Zephyr Teachout, an opponent of common core and high-stakes testing, takes on Gov. Andrew Cuomo in the Sept. 9 Democratic primary?


The study's authors, who ranked the U.S. 19th out of 30 countries, want policymakers to consider how they could make their educational systems more efficient.


An attorney for Washington state asked for more time for legislators to show how they'll dramatically increase K-12 spending by 2018 to satisfy a 2012 court ruling.


The National Association of State Boards of Education has named Francis Eberle as its new deputy executive director.


Texas is considering a timeline for phasing in the impact of new tests on students that resembles an approach recently adopted by New York state.


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