October 2014 Archives

After enacting changes to literacy instruction and fiscal transparency, Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, a Democrat, is seeking re-election against former congressman Bob Beauprez, the Republican nominee.


In a race where K-12 spending is a major issue, Kansas GOP Gov. Sam Brownback is squaring off against a Democratic state legislator, House Minority Leader Paul Davis.


Despite being on opposite sides in the California school chief's race, AFT President Randi Weingarten has worked in concert with the network of charter schools formerly led by Marshall Tuck.


Incumbent GOP Gov. Rick Snyder faces Democrat Mark Schauer, a former legislator and member of Congress, in the contest to be the next governor of Michigan.


In addition to calling for an end to "test and punish" policies, the plan wants government held accountable for providing adequate resources to public schools.


Incumbent Democratic Gov. Dannel Malloy is battling Republican Tom Foley to be Connecticut's next governor, with testing emerging as a major K-12 issue.


Among those seeking a repeat of what happened in Wisconsin in 2010, some have looked at Illinois and recast GOP challenger and investment executive Bruce Rauner in Walker's role.


Breaking with his Republican Party cohorts in a typically deep-red state, Georgia education chief John Barge announced that he was endorsing Democrat Valarie Wilson.


Incumbent GOP Gov. Tom Corbett is facing Democrat Tom Wolf in the race for Pennsylvania governor this year.


State Sen. Wendy Davis (D) and Attorney General Greg Abbott (R) are facing off in the Texas gubernatorial election this year.


Although he's previously stressed the importance of the common core, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said in an Oct. 22 debate: "I have nothing to do with common core."


Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam announced Oct. 22 that the state will soon begin a public "vetting" of the Common Core State Standards through a state-run website.


The MDC report also highlights case studies of how communities in the South are tackling challenges related to education.


For the first time in about 15 years, Massachusetts lawmakers will formally review the state's landmark Education Reform Act of 1993 to consider significant changes to how school funding works.


The majority of states are funding schools less than the levels reached a half-dozen years ago before the Great Recession caused significant budget cuts.


The Louisiana Supreme Court has ruled that the state law changing teacher tenure and evaluations approved in 2012 is constitutional, after a challenge by the Louisiana Federation of Teachers.


The NEA's increased emphasis on state races continues a 2012 trend set in motion by the rise of new and influential education reform groups, like StudentsFirst


Incumbent Tom Torlakson stresses his opposition to some federal policies, while challenger Marshall Tuck says despite union opposition to him, he agrees with many positions held by the California Teachers Association.


The newspaper's ad says: "Vote No! on Question 3. No Guarantees. No Accountability. Devastating for small businesses & families. Consumers would pay more."


The U.S. Department of Education's new Office of State Support will be housed within the Office of Elementary and Secondary Education.


StudentsFirst, the K-12 advocacy group founded by Michelle Rhee, named Jim Blew, an adviser to the Walton Family Foundation, as its new president in an Oct. 7 vote.


Georgia actually began using an integrated math instructional pathway in 2008, before it implemented the common standards. That move has been the subject of much debate over the last few years.


Less than a month ago, a new California political poll showed the race for California schools superintendent between incumbent Tom Torlakson and challenger Marshall Tuck to be a virtual dead heat


Kentucky has released scores from last year's reading and math assessments aligned to the Common Core State Standards. Scores largely increased, but significant achievement gaps remain.


The Student Online Personal Information Protection Act, or SOPIPA, prohibits operators of online educational services from selling student data and using such information to target advertising to students.


Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments