January 2015 Archives

Jindal's Jan. 30 executive order is the latest step in the ongoing battle the Louisiana governor has waged against the standards and tests.


Some school districts participating in the 2014 discussion session about the topic estimated that up to 5 percent of their students are misclassified.


The resolution says the federal government is acting like a national school board and asks the GOP-controlled Congress to return K-12 authority to the states.


Four districts and one county education office in California say the state must provide more financial aid to local K-12 agencies to help them implement state assessments.


Arguably the most hostile relationship in state education politics could be fundamentally altered by Indiana legislators' current plans.


It's unclear what the state party's resolution will mean for the common core in the Evergreen State, which happens to be the home of prominent common-core supporter Bill Gates.


"The assistant principal has to be well-rounded and understand instruction well enough" to prod teachers to foster better results in the classroom, says one official.


The number of states that exert direct control over districts' choice of instructional materials through state funding has dipped from roughly 25 to 18 in recent years.


A recent report from the Education Commission of the States takes a look at how four states are innovatively or effectively tackling the various achievement gaps among students.


Do the changing positions of one key K-12 policymaker in Tennessee highlight the complicated political environment for the Common Core State Standards in the Volunteer State?


The U.S. Department of Education says the Lone Star State has more than a dozen issue areas to address with its teacher evaluation system.


Rice has close ties to Bush's family, having served as secretary of state under Jeb Bush's brother, former President George W. Bush, from 2005 to 2009.


Gov. Andrew Cuomo said in his State of the State speech that, "Our education system needs dramatic reform, and it has for years." What are his plans for K-12 in 2015?


The A-F system was a highlight of former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell's K-12 policy changes, but it was delayed last year, and it could soon be on its way out.


"Assessments can help determine students' progress, inform instruction, and support academic growth, but too many tests fail to meet these standards," said U.S. Rep. Suzanne Bonamici.


Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval, a Republican, wants more money for schools, even though voters rejected a ballot measure designed to increase K-12 spending last year.


Pedro Rivera is the new state chief in Pennsylvania, while Deborah Gist could be moving from Rhode Island to an Oklahoma district.


The Mississippi state board plans to seek a new test for 2015-16, but still plans to administer the PARCC exam this school year.


The state board of education approved $251,000 in funds to help train school-based teams of special education staff in creating new paths for promotion for students.


A leading California budget analyst praises Gov. Jerry Brown's prudence in his K-12 spending and overall budget, while warning against over-exuberance regarding the state's improving fiscal climate.


State lawmakers are considering a ballot initiative on school funding that critics say is merely designed to block a citizen-sponsored measure up for voter approval this November.


In a 400-page draft bill, Sen. Lamar Alexander, the chairman of the U.S. Senate HELP committee, outlined two possible courses for an ESEA rewrite regarding testing.


The political bickering over teacher ratings in the Empire State is slated to continue in 2015, but the evaluations aren't just intended for the eyes of state officials.


A Wisconsin bill backed by powerful state legislators would give schools a choice of certain state assessments. What are the complexities and consequences of that proposal?


Brown also released a proposal to cut down on the state's long-term retiree health care costs in his fiscal 2016 budget proposal.


"It is just imperative to us, to each and every one of us, that we have a check on our students and their academic performance every year," said Maryland chief Lillian Lowery.


Will the Common Core State Standards survive despite opposition rhetoric, or was 2014 just the start of growing backlash to the standards?


"The whooshing water sounds from classroom bathrooms, they feared, might disturb test-taking classmates and send their focus, and their scores, spiraling down the drain."


Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, the chairman of the National Governors Association, said more rigorous expectations for students were important, but not the only consideration for stronger schools.


The Rhode Island education commissioner has previously stated she'd like to stay on under the new Gov.-elect Gina Raimondo, but Gist's current contract expires in June.


Cuomo challenged President Ronald Reagan's vision of America, and successfully pushed to expand college access to poor and middle-class students.


The former Florida governor is stepping away from the group he founded in 2008 that has grown to be one of the most influential K-12 advocacy groups in the country.


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