February 2015 Archives

U.S. District Court Judge Shelly D. Dick ruled that Jindal proved to the court's satisfaction that he had a right to sue the federal government over the common core.


A Missouri judge wrote that the federally funded testing consortium, which developed tests aligned to Common Core State Standards, was never authorized by the U.S. Congress.


In total, Hoosier State students were eligible to receive almost $116 million in voucher funds this school year, compared to $81 million last year.


Superintendent John White revives an idea about testing that he first proposed last summer, and says tweaks to the common core may not be out of order.


A poll shows that Republicans who hold more false beliefs about the standards are more likely to disapprove of the common core. But what about Democrats?


Governors heard updates about the possible direction of federal education law, and stressed that they needed more certainty from Washington as they work to improve schools.


House Bill 1380, which has yet to be voted on in the full House, would bar the use of state funds on materials and activities related to the AP U.S. History course.


A majority of the potential Iowa GOP electorate would find a presidential candidate's common-core support acceptable, but it's pretty much a dead heat in two other states.


Skandera was picked to be the top K-12 official in New Mexico in 2011, but until this week her nomination had stalled even as she performed the duties of the office.


Last year, changes to teacher tenure and school choice were tacked onto the state K-12 spending plan. Could the same happen again for a common-core repeal effort this year?


Kitzhaber had laid out ambitious early-literacy policy proposals after his 2014 re-election, and had also ordered a review of common-core-aligned tests in schools.


"If they are weak, let us strengthen them," the then-Florida governor wrote in an email from 10 years ago after a negative report about the state's content standards.


Do the two state assessments being used in the Bay State accurately measure "college- and career-readiness" of students that so many states now say is their top priority?


The move could increase tensions between Superintendent Diane Douglas, a foe of the common core, and the state school board, which continues to support it.


Gov. Mike Pence, Superintendent Glenda Ritz, and others are seeking emergency changes to the state test after an outcry that it would take students too long to complete.


Bush, the former Florida governor who is mulling a White House run, advocated for choice, assessment, and a low-profile for federal policymakers in K-12.


The decision not to use adaptive testing by three states highlights the complexities associated with a feature of the Smarter Balanced assessment.


The two reports indicate that overall, Utah retains control over its K-12 policy and schools retain control over curriculum under the common core.


In his speech to a conservative group in Washington, the Louisiana Republican said, "I have more confidence in the moms in this room than any collection of bureaucrats."


Deborah Gist has been Rhode Island's chief state school officer since 2009, and has overseen several significant changes to K-12 policy during her tenure.


Nearly one year after winning a controversial NCLB "double-testing" waiver, California is once again seeking significant exemptions from provisions of the federal education law.


After a good deal of uncertainty regarding states' testing plans, we've now got a complete picture of who's doing what for 2014-15 testing.


Florida Sen. John Legg is seeking to reduce standardized testing in Florida and give districts more options for local assessments and how they're used in teacher evaluations.


"My own view is that the government ought to enable and encourage, not mandate, innovation," said U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., the chairman of the Senate education committee.


States have made progress in upgrading assessments and standards, but they aren't necessarily well aligned to each other and to high school diplomas, the study finds.


The two national teachers' unions both made the top 25 givers to state elections in 2014.


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