March 2015 Archives

The Education Commission of the States, which maintains a powerful database of state policies on a host of education policies, waded into the question of how states are using those tests to measure college readiness


On March 30, District Court Judge Tim Kelley dismissed a lawsuit that alleged the state school board violated Louisiana law in adopting the common core.


Gov. Andrew Cuomo declared victory in linking controversial K-12 policy changes to the New York state budget. What are the general details of the agreement?


In addition to a delay, Wisconsin had to eliminate certain questions from its Smarter Balanced exam, after opting not to use the adaptive testing feature of the test.


The districts allege that the state underestimated the cost of teachers' salaries by about $532 million and that the districts face yearly shortfalls in the classroom amounting to about $134 million


Johnny Key, who did not meet earlier prerequisites for the commissioner's job, served in the state legislature from 2003 to 2013 and at one time led the state Senate education committee


Former Gov. Bob McDonnell, a Republican, signed A-F into law two years ago, but the bill ending it came from a fellow Republican in the state Senate.


The U.S. Secretary of Education told members of the Council of Chief State School Officers that states could take the lead on issues like overtesting and early education.


Close to a year ago, one of the common core's authors made a remark about his race when talking about the standards. How have his remarks been discussed and publicized?


A wide-reaching bill from a Florida senator who previously backed a parent-trigger law would affect open-enrollment and charter school policies.


Brian Whiston, the head of Dearborn public schools, will replace Mike Flanagan, the longest-serving state superintendent in the nation.


If Gov. Robert Bentley signs the legislation allowing charter schools, the number of states not allowing charters will drop to seven.


Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal announced legislation to upend the Common Core State Standards and aligned tests in that state, and give lawmakers ultimate power over replacement standards.


If Texas Gov. Greg Abbott were to sign the bill, it would be the second time in two legislative sessions that Texas lawmakers have reduced the mandatory testing burden on students.


The Kansas Legislature has approved a plan to switch K-12 spending from a formula to block grants, but the state's legal system might not approve of the change.


California's school funding formula is designed to help students in need, but do all those children receive the resources the state intends for them?


The South Carolina Board of Education adopted standards intended to replace the Common Core State Standards on March 11, after the state required new standards for the 2015-16 school year


As states roll out new assessments aligned to the Common Core State Standards, they're also considering, or reconsidering, how to use them in accountability systems.


Chiefs for Change says it wishes to focus more on building a bipartisan K-12 consensus with the backing of big-city superintendents, and is ending its affiliation with the Foundation for Excellence in Education.


The superintendent, who would answer directly to the governor, could turn those schools over to charter operators, shut them down, or change the management.


"Ongoing state investment is critical if we wish to build upon the progress that has already been made," a California lawmaker said in announcing the legislation.


A Brookings Institution report shows that in battles over school choice bills in three states, advocacy groups with the same goals didn't always agree about legislation.


While state legislatures have become the focus of anti-common-core politics, state boards have their own role to play.


Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson,a Republican, wants an ex-legislator to lead the state's public schools, but the governor needs a change to state law first.


"It's not a problem [the district itself] can fix," said a spokeswoman for the 260,000-student Broward County district regarding early Florida testing problems.


Ohio and New Mexico provide clear possible consequences for students if they opt out, but the majority of states don't directly address such ramifications, a study finds.


Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments