April 2015 Archives

The plan from Snyder would make the current district responsible only for paying off its debt, while new entities would be responsible for overseeing education.


The use of test scores in teacher evaluations continues to be a controversial issue in many states, and New Jersey could soon agree to reduce the weight of PARCC scores in the 2015-16 evaluations.


The Washington state Supreme Court has said that if lawmakers don't dramatically overhaul and increase K-12 spending in their 2015-17 budget, the justices could impose financial sanctions.


The American Institutes for Research has emerged as major player in recent years in the increasingly competitive world of state assessments.


State board elections in 2014 led to new members and new tension between Commissioner Robert Hammond and board members, including over the common core and aligned tests.


In vetoing a review, Gov. Phil Bryant said he could not let it "become law under the guise that it would lead to the demise of common core."


According to the New York Post, portions of New York state's English/language arts test were posted Wednesday on a Facebook group called "Education is a Journey, Not a Race."


Common-core-repeal bills are failing widely in state legislatures this year, but will bills to review the standards fare any better?


Although the Texas Senate has approved the bill, the Texas House of Representatives has historically been hostile to private school choice legislation.


The six districts and other plaintiffs claimed in the suit that the state had given students academic standards to meet, but not the resources to do so.


There are two testing windows for PARCC, one of two assessments aligned to the Common Core State Standards. What implications does that have for students who might opt out?


Teachers in the Evergreen State say lawmakers aren't doing enough to satisfy a voter-approved initiative to cut class size and meet other K-12 budget imperatives.


New Jersey has attracted a fair bit of media attention over the opt-out issue, but getting hard-and-fast numbers about opt-outs can be a difficult exercise.


Tony Smith previously worked as Oakland superintendent from 2009 to 2013, and then went to work for a Chicago-area nonprofit working on early childhood issues.


Montana Superintendent Denise Juneau said it would be "in the best interest of our students" to let districts cancel Smarter Balanced testing if necessary.


A school shooting at a Colorado high school in 2013 has spurred a proposal to lower the threshold for districts' liability in such cases, but local K-12 officials are critical of the idea.


Gov. Bruce Rauner said that while he likes Christopher Koch, the state needs a new K-12 leader, and the state school board could be ready to pick one.


The lead K-12 budget writer in the Texas House of Representatives wants to change how schools in the second-largest state by enrollment are funded. How does his plan look?


Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker is pushing for cuts to K-12 spending and other policy changes in his biennial budget, but how are his various priorities progressing in the legislature?


The passage of the bill is the culmination of months of pressure in Florida to reduce the amount of testing as well as its consequences students, teachers and schools.


Superintendent John White has told lawmakers that Gov. Bobby Jindal's proposed budget cut would undermine the state's testing program and cause "chaos" for the state's public schools.


N.Y. Regents Chancellor Merryl Tisch recently claimed that a high testing opt-out rate would force the state into switching tests, but does it hold water?


Key state-level groups are applauding the U.S. Senate's proposed rewrite of federal education law unveiled on April 7. What are some details?


On April 3, senators voted to place a 45-hour cap on the amount of time students could spend on state-authorized, standardized tests every year.


In 1990, Kentucky adopted a sweeping K-12 policy overhaul to fix what the state Supreme Court ruled the previous year was an invalid system of public schools.


Alaska, Idaho, Montana, and South Dakota could begin offering state preschool services this year, while Texas and Oregon are also considering major initiatives in early education.


Terry Holliday, who has served as the Bluegrass State's top K-12 official since 2009, announced that he will retire from his post on Aug. 31.


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