July 2015 Archives

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush spent a good chunk of time on his education record during a July 31 speech to the National Urban League. What did he focus on?


The latest state to complete a review of the standards is Arkansas. But its review has led to a somewhat unusual, if not unique, recommendation.


EdSource highlights both per-student spending figures per year and how much spending rose and fell during a single student's 13 years in a K-12 system.


The resolution, which passed by voice vote on July 23, asks the education department to develop the guidelines for students opting out of standardized tests by Sept. 1.


One of the most contentious K-12 spending battles in the nation could be close to a conclusion after over three years of legal and legislative wrangling.


Is a picture worth a thousand words about the Common Core State Standards—or even 140 characters?


PARCC has plans to survive, but the fate of the common-core testing consortium remains very much up in the air as the 2015-16 school year approaches.


The former congressman and current governor of the Buckeye State has a record on K-12 policy that stretches back decades and touches on education spending and school choice.


A lawsuit and two opposing ballot initiatives over school spending in Mississippi promise to create a complicated picture for K-12 spending in the state.


As a deputy commissioner in New York state, Wagner played a key role in overseeing how the state shifted to the Common Core State Standards and aligned assessments.


The state of Nevada, plagued by online testing woes earlier this year, is poised to award its next contract to oversee a suite of state assessments in a $51 million deal.


Claiming that he had "beat the special interests" and "improved education" during his five years in office, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker announced today that he will officially seek the Republican nomination for president.


The Arkansas state board voted to use the ACT Aspire test instead, concluding a public spat over which common-core exam the state would use next year.


Officially, 27.4 percent of eligible students were "confirmed refusals" for taking the Smarter Balanced English/language arts exam, and 28.1 percent of them were confirmed refusals for the math exam.


In a new report, Chad Aldeman and Leslie Kan of Bellwether Education Partners examine recent changes to state retirement systems.


A California lawsuit filed last week claims that the Los Angeles Unified School District is failing to abide by the state's Local Control Funding Formula.


In three states that released preliminary common-core test scores in July, high school students failed to meet predictions for math proficiency. Did experts warn us this was coming?


Webb was a Democratic senator from 2007 to 2013, and worked on English-language learner and testing issues while in the U.S. Senate.


The state released proficiency rates on the English/language arts and math exams for grades 3-8 and 11, as well as what the state had projected would be the results.


Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad has picked Iowa deputy education director Ryan Wise to be the next state chief, replacing Brad Buck.


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