Arkansas was one of 10 states, along with the District of Columbia, to use the PARCC test in the 2014-15 school year.


Are prominent school funding advocates satisfied that states are now giving schools robust and well-targeted financial support? Not even close.


Back in 1998, South Carolina decided to give its new standards some bite by holding students and schools more accountable through standardized tests.


A provision of the state education budget signed by Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon would cut off funding for the Smarter Balanced exam and require a new test for the next school year.


Five years after it was unveiled in Suwanee, Ga., the common core has created two parallel channels of reaction: one among its cheerleaders, and another among its critics.


On May 31, Lone Star State lawmakers approved House Bill 2804, which would extend the state's current method of giving districts letter grades to individual schools.


If signed into law by Gov. Brian Sandoval, who is a school choice proponent, parents will be able to use the per-pupil funding earmarked for their child toward nonpublic school expenses.


Ritz has repeatedly clashed with members of the state school board, Republicans lawmakers who control the state legislature, as well as Gov. Mike Pence.


"It's time to have standards that are even higher," Gov. Chris Christie, a former common-core supporter, said in a May 28 speech.


A 1990 study from the National Commission on Testing and Public Policy found the system of tests in American public schools had become a "hostile gatekeeper" for many students.


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