A Brookings Institution report shows that in battles over school choice bills in three states, advocacy groups with the same goals didn't always agree about legislation.


While state legislatures have become the focus of anti-common-core politics, state boards have their own role to play.


Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson,a Republican, wants an ex-legislator to lead the state's public schools, but the governor needs a change to state law first.


"It's not a problem [the district itself] can fix," said a spokeswoman for the 260,000-student Broward County district regarding early Florida testing problems.


Ohio and New Mexico provide clear possible consequences for students if they opt out, but the majority of states don't directly address such ramifications, a study finds.


U.S. District Court Judge Shelly D. Dick ruled that Jindal proved to the court's satisfaction that he had a right to sue the federal government over the common core.


A Missouri judge wrote that the federally funded testing consortium, which developed tests aligned to Common Core State Standards, was never authorized by the U.S. Congress.


In total, Hoosier State students were eligible to receive almost $116 million in voucher funds this school year, compared to $81 million last year.


Superintendent John White revives an idea about testing that he first proposed last summer, and says tweaks to the common core may not be out of order.


A poll shows that Republicans who hold more false beliefs about the standards are more likely to disapprove of the common core. But what about Democrats?


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