February 2011 Archives

As envisioned by the AFT, an improvement plan for teachers believed to be ineffective would include "clearly articulated measures of success, timelines, support needed, and periodic reviews."


The Education Trust and the Center for American Progress put out recommendations for ESEA's $3 billion Title II program.


I was traveling last week and am headed out again tomorrow, so the posting will probably be spotty here on the blog for a little while. Lots of other news on the teacher front to catch up with, so here are a few things that have caught my attention: • It looks like House Republicans have restored a planned cut to IDEA by proposing a $500 million cut from the $2.95 billion Title II teacher quality state grants program, Alyson Klein reports. A while back I suggested it was politically unpalatable to cut Title II, but I guess it's even...


Secretary of Education Arne Duncan offers more details about what it means to revisit things like seniority and layoff policies.


As they implement reforms, some districts now bargain informally on a monthly basis rather than every few years.


Among other things, the U.S. Secretary of Education called for more accountability for school boards and suggested that districts and unions rethink ways to recruit, retain and assign teachers, in a speech at the Denver union-management collaboration conference.


The U.S. Department of Education's labor-management collaboration conference kicks off today.


Last week Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet sent a letter to the Obama administration urging it to create a "presidential teacher corps" to help fulfill its goal of recruiting 100,000 new teachers in shortage fields over the next five years. Quite a while back, we here at Education Week wondered what kind of teacher-quality proposal Bennet, a Democrat and supposedly one of the administration's go-to senators on education, would put forth. At the time I suggested it might be similar to the "America's Teacher Corps" proposal put out by bunch of teacher-quality scholars last year. They suggested giving teachers a ...


In its fiscal 2010 budget proposal, the Obama administration again preposed combining a number of teacher-quality programs into three new competitive grants.


The NEA applauds the Obama administration's desire to fund local school districts with any additional Race to the Top funding.


A Republican budget proposal would preserve the $2.9 billion state teacher quality formula grant program.


What would happen on the ground if Tennessee lawmakers pass a bill to eliminate collective bargaining for teachers?


Every time you turn around these days it seems that another piece of legislation is introduced by state lawmakers that would seriously affect teachers and their unions. Colleague Sean Cavanagh has a great round-up item up updating the scene in Wisconsin, Florida, and Indiana, among other places. If you're really getting into this, read an EdWeek update on collective bargaining, and another story from Sean earlier this year. Perhaps the most interesting development is happening in Wisconsin, where the state National Education Association affiliate says it's willing to work with lawmakers to craft new evaluation systems and pay reforms taking ...


The National Education Policy Center re-ran the data used in the Los Angeles Times teacher-rating project, and, using a different value-added model, reached quite different conclusions.


Many items pile up each week that I just don't have time to delve into in as much depth as I'd like. But they're the things that made me sit up and take note and will inform future coverage. So, without further ado, here is some of what I've been reading this week. Check these items out and let us all know what you make of them. • Education Sector put out a report about measuring the effectiveness of teacher preparation. It argues that federal reporting requirements designed to get at this question have been undermined and that states are doing...


Schoolwide bonus pay for teachers in New York City doesn't seem to boost student achievement as a general rule—and it also seems to dilute individual incentives for boosting achievement growth. But in those schools with high levels of teacher collaboration, it might have some slight benefits, concludes a new study by two Columbia University economists.


Florida lawmakers reintroduced a bill that would make changes to teacher pay, this time including more safeguards and involving teachers in early negotiations.


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