April 2014 Archives

An English teacher from Patapsco High School & Center for the Arts in Baltimore was named the 2014 National Teacher of the Year.


New York will allow candidates more time to pass a performance-based licensing test.


A poll finds that millennial college students don't find teaching a very prestigious major or profession, and certainly not one that pays enough.


The plan is being billed as an executive action by President Obama to staff all classrooms with effective teachers. In reality, it's a revival of a long-delayed 2012 effort.


Two North Carolina districts, for now, won't have to meet a June 30 mandate under an unpopular law that ends tenure.


An association plans to develop model ethics standards for teachers and other K-12 professionals.


AFT's lesson-sharing partnership has grown to half a million members, the teachers' union says.


Teachers' unions in the state are protesting the change, which was approved by legislators as part of several adjustments to the state's K-12 funding system.


Indiana's teachers posted high scores on their first year under a new teacher-evaluation system.


A settlement in Los Angeles over teacher layoffs does not alter the place of seniority in such decisions.


The American Statistical Association offers its take on the ever-controversial use of value-added methods in teacher evaluation.


Teachers hired during the Great Recession seem to be staying longer.


Teacher evaluations linked to test scores would be delayed under a Maryland bill awaiting the governor's signature.


What will happen to Washington's high-profile education initiatives, such as the IMPACT teacher-evaluation system, once a new mayor takes office?


Illinois has rescinded a policy capping the number of times aspiring teachers can take a basic-skills test.


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