June 2014 Archives

Maryland, its unions, and administrators' groups vow to collaborate on the development of student academic-growth goals.


Gov. Jerry Brown signed off Tuesday on a plan to fully fund California's teacher-pension system by shouldering more of the share of teacher-pension costs onto districts.


A lawsuit modeled on California's Vergara suit is imminent in New York.


A teacher-retention bonus helped keep top teachers in Tennessee's low-performing schools, a new study finds.


Under new legislation, New York's teachers won't be penalized for low scores on the state test-score based portion of their evaluation in 2013-14 and 2014-15.


Two recent studies on TFA examine facets of the program. One continues to find that recruits boosted math scores in Miami schools, although they didn't seem to have much effect on their peer teachers. Another finds that older recruits are more likely to stay in the profession.


D.C. won't use a test-score-based method for judging teachers in 2014-15.


The Washington-based group contends that alternative certification suffers from low standards and poor training, just like its traditional, university-based brethren.


A New York City schools policy that encourages principals to closely consider teacher-tenure decisions before awarding that status appears to have encouraged less-effective educators to leave the profession, new research shows.


The AFT President is angry about how U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan responded to the decision in Vergara v. California.


A study finds that teachers reported having more classroom autonomy and more support from peers and administrators after the 2002 law took effect.


Some of the reaction on the ruling in Vergara lawsuit from plaintiffs, as well as critics.


A California superior-court judge struck down the state's laws governing teacher tenure, seniority, and dismissal.


A judge threw out a Denver lawsuit over "mutual consent" hiring provisions in a state law that did away with forced teacher placements.


The unions face the challenge of brushing up on a fundamental labor principle.


New York City educators voted to approve a contract with 18 percent raises, but many unanswered questions.


Teachers are absent about 11 days on average, a new report concludes, but for a subset of teachers that figure is much higher.


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