June 2017 Archives

Union watchdog and critic Mike Antonucci won't attend the National Education Association's 2017 Representative Assembly in person.


Arizona districts are using the state's emergency substitute certificate program to staff classrooms with teachers who only have a high school diploma or its equivalence.


Students feel happier, more valued, and more motivated when they have a teacher of the same race and gender as them, a new study finds.


Stephen Sawchuk will head over to the Curriculum Matters blog and Liana Loewus will be writing here at Teacher Beat.


A bipartisan group of senators today introduced a bill aimed at giving teachers more opportunities to take on leadership roles without having to leave the classroom.


Teachers in East Greenwich, Rhode Island, are using a labor action called "work-to-rule," under which employees do no more than what is required in their contracts.


Elementary math teachers remember what they learn in their teacher preparation programs, and use it when writing lesson plans years down the road, according to a new study.


The teachers say district's alternatives to suspensions and expulsions are making classrooms less safe.


But the deal is worth $245 more than the district has budgeted, so some say it could trigger layoffs down the road.


The Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation, or CAEP, has elected Dean Karen Symms Gallagher of the University of Southern California's Rossier School of Education to lead its board of directors.


Researchers at University of Wisconsin-Madison are developing a video game that will guide K-12 teachers through the hazards of unconscious attitudes and assumptions that affect the way they see their students.


With Title II money on the chopping block under President Trump's desired budget, national education groups are coming together to make a case for why teachers and administrators need those professional development funds.


The union that represents teachers at 32 charter schools in Chicago voted Friday to merge with the 30,000-member Chicago Teachers Union.


Republican lawmakers and Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder are close to a deal that would change the state's retirement system for new teachers.


Teachers' unions could suffer losses in membership and money if the Supreme Court sides with plaintiffs in a new case challenging mandatory fees.


New Mexico and Tennessee have strong plans to identify weak teachers and make sure they're not disproportionately serving poor and minority students, according to the National Council on Teacher Quality.


Guilford County Schools recruiters traveled 1,000 miles west to downtown Oklahoma City to host a two-day teacher fair.


A bill passed in the California Assembly on Thursday would give districts more timetime—up to three yearstime—to decide whether to fire or permanently hire teachers.


California issued more than 10,000 temporary credentials during the 2015-16 school year.


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