A state court ruled that Virginia must turn over growth data by school and classroom teacher, without redacting the teachers' names.


U.S. Education Secretary John B. King Jr. spoke with a group of Boston public school educators at Gardner Pilot Academy about diversity in the teaching force.


Worried about the state's competitiveness, Alabama lawmakers pass the first teacher salary increases in nearly a decade.


Matching some of the most generous policies in the country, Mississippi will offer $10,000 annual stipends to National Board Certified Teachers willing to take on some of the state's toughest assignments.


The union contends that the system, which would have districts base at least 20 percent of a teacher's score on "student growth measures," violates a state law that requires that educators' evaluations be based exclusively on "observable, job-related behavior."


Just as it did recently with teacher evaluations tied to student achievement tests, New York is posed to walk back its efforts to heighten the requirements for entrance into the teaching profession.


The state's highest court rules that lawmakers can't take away tenure rights already granted to teachers.


Not surprisingly given the history of the case, the new ruling in the Vergara v. California case has been met conflicting reactions—as well as vows on both sides to press for change.


A California appeals court has reversed the trial court's original ruling in Vergara v. the State of California, the landmark case on teacher job-protection provisions.


Four Minnesota mothers, represented by both local and national advocacy groups, have filed suit in a district asserting that the state's teacher-tenure protections keep bad teachers in classrooms, where they are dooming thousands of Minnesota children to substandard educations.


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