Three groups recently released briefs on teacher evaluation systems.


States that apply for No Child Left Behind waivers must institute guidelines for teacher-evaluation systems, including consideration of student outcomes.


Teachers increasingly appear to be joining groups to help shape policy.


Attrition among first year teachers may be as high as 10 percent, according to the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics.


A bill to be introduced by Republican senators takes aim at the "highly qualified" teacher requirements in the No Child Left Behind Act.


The nonprofit manager of a school-reform program is expanding its work to include teacher-evaluation technical assistance.


Networks of charter schools are increasingly helping to train teachers.


Qualifications such as certification and holding a master's degree bear no relationship to a teacher's performance as measured by growth in student test scores, concludes a new brief released by the Manhattan Institute, a conservative-leaning think tank.


Shortly following a 2010 Supreme Court decision, the NEA moved to set up a Super PAC.


A story out of Syracuse, N.Y., outlines an interesting and relevant conundrum: When district budgets get tight, should you keep as many teacher jobs as possible—or let some folks go in order to preserve the training that's supposed to help those who keep their jobs do their best work? That appears to be the dilemma in Syracuse, where Superintendent Sharon Conteras and several of the education policy commissioners want to prioritize investments in professional development. Sounds great, right? The catch is that hundreds of employees lost their jobs last year, and the article notes that it's not clear...


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