Denver's ProComp pay program may have helped attract more-effective teachers to the district and boosted retention in hard-to-serve schools, according to a report on the much-discussed system released recently by the University of Colorado at Boulder. Teachers opting into the program also appear to be slightly more effective on the whole. The analysis was based on student and teacher data from eight school years, from 2001-02 through 2008-09. (ProComp began in 2005-06 , with opt-in periods for teachers in 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009.) Researchers compared each student's results with those of other students with similar achievement histories and traced the ...


Former Georgia Gov. Roy Barnes is seeking teachers' union support for a re-election bid.


Pittsburgh's new teacher contract contains two performance-pay plans, in addition to an overhauled salary schedule.


Results from year one of a pilot teacher-evaluation system in Chicago show a much broader range of ratings under the new system than under the district's existing one, with at least 8 percent of pre-tenured teachers receiving at least one "unsatisfactory" rating, according to a new paper out from the Consortium on Chicago School Research. Although Chicago is not the only district putting a new teacher-evaluation system in place, it is certainly one of the few that's paying a lot of attention to implementation, studying it, and documenting the results. The system, based on Charlotte Danielson's Framework for Teaching, was ...


Yesterday's post on the as-yet-unseen Bennet teacher bill got me thinking a bit about what other pieces of teacher legislation could be candidates for inclusion in a revised Elementary and Secondary Education Act draft. Here are a few proposals that might have legs. • In what is, to my knowledge, the first actual bill to propose addressing the Title I comparability 'loophole,' Rep. Chaka Fattah, D-Pa., has introduced the ESEA Fiscal Fairness Act. One provision of note specifies that this change does not endorse or require the forced transfer of teachers, one of the concerns of teachers' unions. This bill...


Over at Politics K-12, Alyson Klein has a very interesting item up about Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., who recently introduced a school-turnaround bill. While some folks are poring over that, though, here in the teacher-quality universe the question on the table is: What the heck happened to Bennet's teacher bill? For months, the senator was said to be working on a teacher-quality bill that would no doubt have generated a lot of attention, given his closeness to the current administration on education issues. As the former superintendent in Denver, he's also had a lot of experience working with teachers. For ...


Michele "High Bar" McNeil has been doggedly following the latest Race to the Top news, this debate over "side deals" in some Florida districts. The big question is whether these side agreements essentially compromise the "buy in" of local district and unions who signed the state memorandum of understanding. More from Eduwonk here, and Sherman Dorn at his blog thinks we're all off in left field. Dorn makes some important points, explaining that some of the apparent redundancy in these local "side agreements" has to do with the fact that the scope of bargaining in Florida differs from that in ...


The National Institute for Excellence in Teaching, which oversees the popular Teacher Advancement Program school-reform model, is commissioning its own study to figure out why its Chicago site had disappointing results, compared to some of its other sites, according to this release. Interactive, Inc., an Ashland, Va.-based education program evaluator, will try to determine which variables in Chicago might have led to the results, the NIET group said. The study is being hailed by some in the field as the death knell for performance pay, but that's probably a bit premature for a couple of reasons. As I noted ...


After getting clobbered in the first round of the Race to the Top, Oklahoma has managed to pass some aggressive pieces of legislation in preparation for round two. Among them is a bill that makes major changes to the state's teacher evaluation and tenure systems. It's similar to legislation that passed Colorado, in that teachers who score at the "ineffective" level on the new instrument for two years running could be dismissed. The state also is poised to join the expanding group of states basing 50 percent or more of a teacher's evaluation on student academic progress. (Like many of ...


Mayor Bloomberg's plan to save over 4,000 teacher jobs comes at a cost: the elimination of proposed raises.


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