Providence, R.I., will implement site-based hiring rather than seniority-based hiring and "bumping" in six schools this year, according to this must-read story in the Providence Journal (see here for background.) Superintendent Tom Brady says that the city has over 500 applicants for just 75 positions, and many of the applicants come from private or suburban schools, the story notes. The entire district will move to the site-based hiring system in 2010-2011. Teacher applicants are interviewed by the principal, two teachers chosen by the principal, two chosen by the school improvement team, and a teacher leader. The New Teacher Project, ...


The California Teachers Association is going all out to protest Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's proposal to waive Prop. 98, the minimum school funding law, to make up part of the state's $24 billion budget shortfall. See this story for details. The union delivered 10,000 postcards to the governor this week, collected while at the National Education Association's Representative Assembly in San Diego. (Not coincidentally, about that many teachers and educational-support personnel attend the RA.) Watch the press conference that CTA President David Sanchez held on the floor of the RA in this video. This isn't the first time CTA and ...


An Obama administration official has strongly hinted to New York state that it won't be getting any of the $5 billion in discretionary stimulus funding unless it does something about the law, supported by the state's teachers' unions, that prevents student test scores from being a part of tenure or other personnel decisions, reports Elizabeth Green Maura Walz at Gotham Schools (We regret the error.) In other states, this dough is becoming quite a tantalizing carrot for states and districts who are eager to qualify for Race to the Top and Innovation funds. We're seeing some significant state action on ...


A few wrap-up items from the NEA convention. —A reader pointed out that I goofed up on the number of the new business item discussed in this post. It was 69, not 70. (Thanks JB.) —Per this item, a few people have written in with the percentage of Teach For America teachers who go on to teach a third year. According to the folks from TFA, a Harvard study on corps members found that 61 percent remain in teaching beyond two years, 36 percent for more than four years. Find it here. —Per this item on NEA delegations'...


The outgoing general counsel emphasizes that the NEA is a union first and foremost and must represent its members.


The new head of the union's committee on the ESEA (aka NCLB) weighs in on its testing requirements and on the link between the federal law's renewal and the economic-stimulus package.


It's interesting how a huge democratic, deliberative body can take practically anything controversial and render it palatable to the majority. The original language of new business item 62 at this year's NEA Annual Convention would have mobilized the union against the "national standards movement" out of fear that it would lead to a national testing program. The item passed, but only after delegates substituted language that directs the union to engage in a dialogue with stakeholders about the national goals and ensure teachers are part of the dialogue. And who doesn't support that?...


The Stanford professor says she believes the Obama administration is committed to reforms done in partnership with teachers, not to them.


From Guest Blogger Dakarai I. Aarons American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten has been gathering the roses as she prepares to step down at the end of the month from her position as president of the New York City based United Federation of Teachers, the largest AFT local. But at least one New York-based group is all too ready to see her go: editorial writers at The Wall Street Journal, who took to the pages today with a strident criticism of Weingarten's 11-year presidency (she's been a UFT staffer since the Reagan administration). The WSJ folks say Weingarten and ...


Those who control language control cultural power, the theory goes. In the long run, though, does the concept of these schools work?


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