From Guest Blogger Liana Heitin For those who know a little about the Teacher Advancement Program but have had trouble discerning the nuances of the initiative (like me), take a look at Stephen’s recent article, which gives the best explanation I have seen. As poignantly noted, when people hear TAP, they often translate “performance pay”—yet the crux of the model is in the word “advancement.” For some teachers, the open-door policy and constant accountability that enforce the culture of advancement are too much to bear, so they leave—or self-select out. Could this be the answer to President ...


From Guest Blogger Liana Heitin In this climate of rampant layoffs, most people are concentrated on finding ways to keep teachers in the classroom. Yet (and it seems hardly controversial to point out) not all teachers should stay. The St. Petersburg Times reports that when budget cuts are not an issue, firing a teacher can be more than a little difficult. Ron Matus of The Times tells the story of Roy Sachse, a tenured P.E. teacher in Florida with a history of inappropriate behavior. In one 18-month period, Sachse reportedly sent a note to a female student asking her ...


The stimulus guidance is up, and it contains what to me seems like a real jaw-dropper on the teacher-quality front. To receive their second cut of state stabilization funds, states will need to show they are capable of reporting the number and percentage of teachers and principals rated at each performance level under each local district's teacher-evaluation system. The federal government has, in the past, been very hands-off of teacher evaluation. I can see this being a real challenge on a number of fronts. First off, I'm not even sure how many districts keep computerized records of the results of ...


There seems to be a lot of interest these days in on-the-job teacher training provided through professional learning communities, or teams of teachers that meet to review student data and samples of student work and compare teaching strategies. Now some districts in Utah are rearranging their school schedules to give teachers paid time to work this way, according to this story. Two of the districts will start Fridays 60 to 90 minutes late, or end school early, to facilitate the common planning time. The story gives some great examples of how this kind of professional development can be utilized. Teachers ...


The Charleston Daily Mail has this interesting story about a bill in the legislature that would allow counties to conduct detailed interviews with teacher candidates before deciding to hire them. Right now, the story says, districts can only check to verify coursework and training. All other decisions are made on the basis of a checklist of teacher evaluations, qualifications, and seniority. The teachers' unions and a member of the Charleston school board both said the proposal would open the door to favoritism and nepotism by county boards of education. The teachers unions have vowed to fight the bill. But one ...


It's turning out to be a day of wonk-tastic posts at Teacher Beat, but when there are billions of dollars hanging in the balance, details really do matter. Case in point: The accountability principles in the stimulus bill require districts that receive Title I recovery funds to "report a school-by-school listing of per-pupil educational expenditures from state and local sources." Right now, it's not clear whether these expenditures are going to include actual teacher salaries. Under the current Title I, districts can just submit a district-wide salary average to prove that resources are equitably allocated among high- and low-poverty school ...


I'm hearing rumblings that the Obama administration is going to take the teacher-effectiveness and teacher-distribution language in the stimulus bill seriously. If you're looking for a primer on those issues, take a look at this story I wrote not long ago. Delaware is one of a handful of states that's doing some really exciting work on teacher distribution. The state, in collaboration with the Mid-Atlantic Regional Education Laboratory, the Mid-Atlantic Comprehensive Center, and the National Comprehensive Center for Teacher Quality—three federally supported technical-assistance/research bodies—is using state teacher data and surveys of administrators, to figure out the working conditions...


The education secretary wants weak teacher-prep programs to shape up, and reminds union leaders that federal stimulus dollars are saving classroom jobs.


The education secretary discussed ways to reward talent and encourage ineffective educators to move on.


Now THIS is interesting. Apparently, there's a big panel discussion on 21st-century skills going on today at the National Education Association's headquarters. NEA, one of the founding partners of the Partnership for 21st Century Skills, is hosting. I heard about the event in a very roundabout way and sent a puzzled e-mail to a bunch of folks inquiring whether I could drop by and attend, since I've written about 21st-century skills in two recent stories. I was extended an invitation by one NEA official, only to have it rescinded minutes later by another. The panelists all appear to be supportive ...


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