The forum on teacher support I attended on Nov. 5 raised some interesting ideas about how to improve teaching quality. In this post I'm going to attempt to make a little bit of sense of them. A comprehensive system for teacher support, the panelists said, starts with a clear definition of high-quality teaching. Supports are built around how to foster it and bolster it, how to determine whether teachers are practicing it, how to offer teachers who are struggling opportunities to ask for and receive help, and ultimately how to build additional professional opportunities for veterans that feed back into ...


I attended a forum on D.C. teacher professional development last night sponsored by this group and I'll be writing a few posts on it this week. But first I wanted to report what I thought was the most interesting observation of the evening, made by none other than American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten. Panelists were asked by one member of the audience (on an index card, so I can't say who it was) how D.C. could agree on a system of teacher supports in the place of what the questioner described as the "punitive" system of ...


Ever wondered how teacher performance-pay plans might fare in these tough economic times? Already, we've had lashings of bad news from districts around the country as they cut down on teacher jobs and teacher salaries and revise pension plans. Just today, a report in the Orlando Sentinel said that three months into the school year, most Florida teachers are working for the same salaries they made last year, because of stalled budget negotiations in many districts. Florida has a projected $3.5 billion revenue shortfall for its coming fiscal year, and some expect worse news when economists issue their next ...


Here's an update on the Philadelphia teacher-contract negotiations: The Philadelphia Federation of Teachers and the district agreed to extend the current agreement by a year. PFT members will get a 4 percent increase next March. "Both parties have identified a number of areas of common concern that we will be working together to address such as: providing a safe environment in and around schools for students and staff; developing targeted and fiscally responsible approaches to reducing class size; improving teacher quality by recruiting and retaining qualified and effective teachers and improving both evaluation and support of them; insuring that teacher ...


The Institute of Education Sciences has quietly released a study that's almost guaranteed to cause a lot of chatter if not outright controversy in the eduworld. According to the study, the two comprehensive programs studied in their first year—one from the Princeton, N.J.-based ETS and one from the New Teacher Center, in Santa Cruz, Calif.—did not improve student achievement, rates of teacher rentention, or teacher practices. Comprehensive induction programs, unlike the informal, often unfunded "buddy systems" common to districts, provide training for mentors, support "release time" for teachers and mentors to meet on a weekly basis,...


That's a famous line from The Wizard of OZ, and it's basically at the heart of this story in the Washington Post about the D.C. contract negotiations. According to a letter sent by AFT President Randi Weingarten to WTU President George Parker, back in July, Parker had requested that AFT not be involved in the negotiations. But concerns about the then-tight relationship between Parker and D.C. Chancellor Michelle Rhee, along with complaints from local members about the two-tiered pay proposal has caused the AFT to watch the negotiations quite closely. The national union commissioned a private poll of ...


Yesterday's testy education debate between Barack Obama's education adviser, Linda Darling-Hammond, and John McCain's education aide, Lisa Graham Keegan, got even testier when subjects like teacher performance pay and alternative-preparation routes like Teach For America cropped up. (To watch the whole debate at Teachers' College, register here). On performance pay, the fight came down to which one is better: a career-ladder and peer-evaluation approach that Darling-Hammond touted, or a let's-pay-teachers-who-raise-student-scores approach that Keegan held up. Calling performance pay a "key part" of McCain's education program, Keegan described a plan in which school principals should be the people in charge of ...


Over at Swift & Change Able, Charlie Barone takes on California's focus (or lack thereof ) on teacher-quality initiatives, drawing on the Center on Education Policy's reports on school restructuring and the Renee v.Spellings lawsuit on the "highly qualified" teacher definition. The state has long tussled with federal legislators on teacher quality. Its 1996 class-size program caused big hiring problems for poorer districts, reportedly angering Congressman George Miller, D-Calif., who chairs the House Education and Labor Committee. The state's initial definition of highly qualified was deemed inappropriate by the Education Department. More recently, California districts have been accused of taking underqualified ...


Randi Weingarten has taken issue with my saying in an earlier blog post that the New York City performance-pay plan had been "forced down the throat" of the United Federation of Teachers. In a phone conversation this week, Weingarten emphasized that she was the one who took the initiative to the table. "I negotiated the plan and I believe that the plan actually helped us prove to the school system that collaboration is a key ingredient to school success," said Weingarten, who, as my earlier blog post pointed out, has always spoken very positively about the plan in public. As ...


Portfoliogate has just come up as a big issue in the campaign (see Mike Petrilli here and my colleague Michele McNeil here). It's great to see such a wonky topic outside the field attracting attention. Of course, I want to hear more discussion about the teacher implications. And it seems that like so much else in education, this is a matter of tradeoffs: Portfolio assessments certainly have the potential to give teachers richer information about student achievement than standardized tests alone. But they are also a lot of work for teachers to create and to score. Nebraska, the only state ...


Follow This Blog

Advertisement

Most Viewed on Education Week

Categories

Archives

Recent Comments