UFT President Randi Weingarten this afternoon proposed her solution to the problem of "excessed" teachers in New York City--an immediate hiring freeze. Excessed teachers are those who have lost their jobs because of their schools closing or downsizing and who have not been able to find new jobs because of a new district policy that allows principals to hire those that are a good fit regardless of seniority. The New Teacher Project released a report earlier this week that said the excessed teachers will cost the city $74 million this school year. The project has urged the district to make ...


A nonprofit group, Teachers in Space, is seeking applications for a program to fly teachers to space in suborbital vehicles and return them to the classroom. The original NASA Teachers in Space program ended with the 1986 Challenger disaster, which killed teacher-astronaut Christa McAuliffe and six other crew members. The program was retooled as the Educator Astronaut program, in which former educators became full-time NASA employees, but did not return to their classrooms. Barbara Morgan was the first Educator Astronaut. She flew aboard the space shuttle in August 2007. The Teachers in Space nonprofit was set up to revive the ...


The Dallas Morning News has a story this morning about the district wanting to use $18 million of Title I money to pay the salaries of 300 teachers. The district, apparently, has a shortfall of $84 million in its budget. But this is not sitting well with the state education department, which says that federal money cannot be spent on making up for local budget cuts. And that, state officials say, is in effect what Dallas plans to do. The imbroglio in Dallas does make one wonder about how states and school districts will cope with budget woes in a ...


Responding to the New Teacher Project's report on excessed teachers in New York who will cost the city $74 million this school year, United Federation of Teachers Randi Weingarten has called a press conference at 4 p.m. tomorrow where she will be joined by "several of the hundreds of educators in the Absent Teacher Reserve (ATR) pool who have tried for months to secure permanent teaching positions despite Department of Education policies that hinder their efforts." Stay tuned as we bring you more on this....


The promise of more money has not exactly sent school districts in Minnesota rushing to embrace Gov. Tim Pawlenty's widely touted Q Comp performance-pay plan for teachers. After three years, in 2007-08, only 39 of the state's 334 districts and 21 charter schools had signed up for it. Part of it might have to do with the fact that the plan requires local unions to get on board. And as is well known by now, unions are not the biggest fans of performance pay, although Minneapolis had implemented a popular, union-approved performance-pay plan before Q Comp. Now Pawlenty, a Republican, ...


The Algiers Charter Schools consortium in New Orleans just received a $17.6 million grant from the federal Teacher Incentive Fund, a program designed to seed performance-based compensation programs. Algiers' grant was initially given to the Lakewood County school district, in Florida, but that district faced internal squabbles about implementation and opted out after its first year. Like a number of other TIF grantees, Algiers will use the Teacher Advancement Program model. TAP, which is overseen by the Santa Monica, Calif.-based National Institute for Excellence in Teaching, includes standards-based professional development and a career ladder for teachers, in addition ...


The Washington Teachers Union membership is meeting tonight about the proposed D.C. contract, including its "red" and "green" compensation tiers. To my great dismay, media aren't allowed to attend. But I'm betting this will be the contract's make-or-break moment. The head of the WTU, George Parker, said on PBS' Jim Lehrer Newshour recently that members are polling 2-to-1 against the contract. The contract would allow teachers opting the "green" tier to earn up to $20,000 annually in bonuses, but they'd forgo tenure protections for one year for that opportunity. "Red" tier teachers would maintain the existing pay schedule. ...


Teachers overwhelmingly think that high school students should be taught rudimentary aspects of personal finance, according to a new survey by Americans Well-Informed on Automotive Retailing Economics, a group that promotes consumer education on car financing. Such aspects would including basic savings and retirement investing (94 percent), financing a car purchase (92 percent), financing a home purchase (91 percent), maintaining a household budget (98 percent), managing a credit card (98 percent), managing a bank account (99 percent), acquiring medical insurance (97 percent), and acquiring a student loan (97 percent). Additionally, 72 percent of teachers said that students old enough to ...


There's a mysterious drop in the number of teachers with master's degrees in the state of West Virginia. According to data from the state's department of education, the number of such teachers declined 5 percent over the past decade. Some attribute it to the baby boomer-retirement exodus. Others to the fact that bad economic times are causing fewer teachers to seek master's degrees. Yet others to the inevitable argument that teachers are leaving for higher-paying jobs in other fields. You can read more about it here in the Charleston Daily Mail. Interestingly, during the time that the number of teachers ...


Teacher shortage? Not in New York City, where 1,000 "excessed" teachers will go without jobs in the 2008-09 school year while receiving full pay and benefits at a cost of $74 million to the school district. These teachers are the fallout of a new hiring policy in the city that allows school administrators to hire teachers that are a good fit regardless of seniority, according to an updated version of a report released by the New Teacher Project. The excessed teachers are those who lose their jobs as a result of schools downsizing and closing. The teachers are then ...


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