Team R & R over at the Center for American Progress has an article that explores some of the themes Teacher Beat wrote about in this post with respect to the cost-effectiveness and impact on student achievement of laying off teachers by seniority level rather than effectiveness. Eduwonk (and possible Duncan appointee?) Andy Rotherham picks up the thread here. We suspect there will be more chatter about this if the financial situation doesn't improve and districts are forced to cull more teaching positions. Stay tuned....


There is plenty of speculation over whether teacher-accountability systems should include evaluations from students. Students, the argument in favor of the idea goes, are the best and most logical judges of teacher effectiveness since they are actually in the learning environment. If that is true, high school teachers in Providence, R.I., just got a failing mark from their students. A student-sponsored survey in the district found that high schoolers are generally not happy with their teachers. The survey collected information from nearly 1,700 students, or about 21 percent of the city's public high schoolers. Common complaints included: Teachers ...


The fine folks over at the National Center for Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education Research have an interesting study up on the use of student test-score data in tenure decisions. Of late, some economists who study the teacher workforce, such as Thomas Kane at Harvard and Eric Hanushek at Stanford, have argued that it might make more sense to see how teachers are doing on the job and then set policies to transition out ineffective teachers, rather than attempt to prescreen teacher-candidates for effectiveness. Most districts do the latter but not the former, and that process hasn't proved very ...


Over the inaugural weekend, I did some reporting for another Education Week blog, Politics K-12. And, of course, I had my eye out for interesting teacher-related events. So make sure to check out details about the National Education Association's participation in the Inaugural Parade; read about the lesson the school director of the KIPP Academy of Opportunity, in Los Angeles, taught in front of the Lincoln Memorial on Martin Luther King Jr. Day; and attend a reception for Linda Darling-Hammond, whose academic career has focused on scholarly work on teacher preparation and professional development....


Here's an idea for retaining teachers who might want to move out of their jobs to administrative positions or other professions in order to make more money. A commission created by Alabama Gov. Bob Riley has recommended a system in which teachers can advance in their careers and get higher pay without leaving the classroom. Teachers could move from "apprentice teacher" to "classroom teacher" to "professional teacher" to "master teacher" and then "learning designer," all by meeting certain education and experience requirements. Each designation, the commission's report says, would provide teachers with different opportunities. For instance, a master teacher might ...


Here's a rundown of teacher-related funding in the House's stimulus package: $13 billion each for Title I and IDEA grants. Much of that money would support the hiring of teachers and paraprofessionals and the provision of professional development. $100 million for the Teacher Quality Enhancement Grants (Title II of the Higher Education Act). This would be a big win for teachers' colleges, which have seen this grant dwindle steadily down over the years. It could be used in support of partnerships to improve teacher education, including the establishment of residency programs. $100 million for the National Science Foundation to support ...


This just in: It looks like the economic stimulus package on Capitol Hill will include $200 million or "competitive grants to school districts and states to provide financial incentives for teachers and principals who raise student achievement and close the achievement gaps in high-need schools." That sounds a lot like performance-based pay to me. $200 million is no small figure. It's more than twice what the federal Teacher Incentive Fund, the government's current performance-pay program, gets each year. We're trying to locate some additional details; check back here and over at Campaign K-12 for more. If it is performance pay, ...


This story from the Los Angeles Times portends really tough times for that district's teaching force. The school board approved a measure to give 2,300 teachers the pink slip if the fiscal situation doesn't improve. No wonder the state is pushing so hard for operating relief in the stimulus package currently being fleshed out on Capitol Hill. The story also indicates that the district will probably have to give up its love of smaller class sizes, suggesting that some may rise to nearly 30 students. The layoffs, the story indicates, would be targeted at teachers with fewer than two ...


Mike Antonucci, the union watchdog blogger at EIA Intercepts, has this contrary viewpoint to what he calls the "mass hysteria" in the media about the unionization of two New York City KIPP schools. "All this hoohah is silly," he writes. "How many stories have you read about the 355 new charter schools that opened this year? How many of them are unionized?" It's certainly true that a vast majority of charter schools are not unionized, and the teachers' unions have had a very hard time making inroads into such schools in the past. Still, the fact that charters that are ...


Our intrepid colleague Alyson Klein reports on a letter ostensibly sent by the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education opposing New Leaders for New Schools President Jon Schnur, Teach For America CEO Wendy Kopp, and Education Sector Co-Founder Andy Rotherham, also known as "eduwonk," as appointments for the Education Department. The gloves are really off in this letter, which says that Kopp, Schnur, and Rotherham "have evidenced a constant and intense disregard for working with the organized education community" and that their appointments would signal "expansion for organizations that promote the revolving door of under-qualified teachers as the best ...


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