The amount of time that U.S. public school teachers spend teaching has been greatly overstated, according to a new study by Teachers College at Columbia University, and that has led to mistaken comparisons between the U.S. educational system and those of the world's highest-performing countries.


Two weeks after Boston teachers approved a plan to lengthen the school day by 40 minutes in elementary and middle schools, the city school board also gave its approval for the agreement that affects some 23,000 students at about 60 schools.


The growth in after-school programs, especially those focused on academics and enrichment activities in the arts, computer coding, and hands-on science, all have at least one challenge in common—funding.


Members of the Boston Teachers Union voted by about 4-to-1 favor of a plan to add 40 minutes a day to 60 of the district's elementary and middle schools in order to improve student achievement.


Teachers in Boston vote this week on a tentative agreement, reached after on-again, off-again negotiations, to add 40 minutes a day to elementary and middle schools.


Expanded learning time means something different to every school and district, and a new study from the Center on Education Policy finds that, given the flexibility to implement ELT based on local needs, priorities, and resources, school officials are more inclined to develop innovative ways of improving student achievement and teaching instruction.


The YMCA is seeking to expand an after-school pilot program designed to help close the achievement gap for low-income children after early research found that students are showing significant gains in the social-emotional skills they need to do well in school.


For every tax dollar the state invests in quality after-school and summer-learning programs, it gets back $2.18 in benefits, according to a report and financial analysis from the state's PreK-16 Council.


The United States wastes $21 billion dollars a year making up for summer learning loss, according to an analysis of scores of studies by ReadyNation, a nonprofit working to strengthen the workforce by pushing policymakers to fund expanded learning programs.


Children with disabilities who are enrolled in Trenton, N.J., public schools will have their own after-school program beginning in early January, after the school board and a local advocacy group reached an agreement last week to collaborate on the program.


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