The federal education budget for fiscal year 2015 contains small signs of hope for extended-learning programs, with a slight increase in funding for the 21st Century Community Learning Center program, which is the largest federal source of funding for after-school programs.


The Annenberg Institute for School Reform releases a blueprint for high-quality extended-learning programs, based on a study of model programs in low-income schools in six large cities.


Students attending a full-day, free, summer program run by their district showed significant gains in mathematics but not in reading, according to the first report from the first longitudinal study of five large, urban school districts.


Children living with two married parents are significantly more likely to participate in after-school sports, clubs, and enrichment activities, such as art, music, and dance, than children whose parents live together, but aren't married, according to a new report from the U.S. Census Bureau.


Expanding learning by lengthening the school day isn't always feasible; a new report profiles some California school districts that have turned to creative scheduling to give students more time to learn.


Several New York State school districts awarded state grants for extended learning time decline the funds saying they weren't given enough time to properly implement the program.


NASA encourages girls to the reach for the stars through out-of-school programs designed to make the STEM field exciting through hands-on projects, community mentors, and robotics.


Fifth grade students are getting homework from an unlikely source, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, through a school program developed to teach children how to prepare for natural disasters and emergencies and then develop those plans with their families.


Full-day kindergarten significantly increases literacy skills for all children, with the biggest gains seen among Hispanic children, according to a new study from the University of Virginia.


The difference between attending a high-poverty and a low-poverty high school in California is nearly two weeks of instructional time a year, UCLA researchers find.


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