Taxpayers are entitled to know if underperforming schools are making a comeback. But even when evidence shows they are turning around, they continue to be penalized. Two public schools recently in the news serve as cases in point. M.S. 223, a middle school in the South Bronx, has received three straight A's on the report card issued by New York City's Department of Education since Ramon Gonzalez became principal in Sept. 2003 ("The Fragile Success of School Reform in the Bronx," The New York Times Magazine, Apr 10). According to the latest progress report, which judges a school based ...


If taxpayers were not confused enough about conflicting claims over the best way to improve schools, they were left in an even more perplexed state after reading an op-ed written by Vinton G. Cerf ("How to Fire Up U.S. Innovation," The Wall Street Journal, Apr. 12). Cerf, who helped develop the Internet, has impeccable credentials. But he comes up with the wrong answer to the question he poses about why America's K-12 education system is unlikely to turn out enough innovators in technology in the years ahead. If Cerf genuinely wants young people to "understand and experience the thrill ...


In the entertainment business, anything that swiftly rises to the top of the charts is referred to as "number one with a bullet." The term doesn't necessarily denote quality, merely quantity. I thought of Michelle Rhee in this connection after reading an op-ed in the New York Daily News by Richard Whitmire ("Why Michelle Rhee is public enemy number one in education reform debate: She challenged bad teachers," Apr. 1). He is the author of The Bee Eater: Michelle Rhee Takes on the Nation's Worst School District. Whitmire is certainly entitled to his assessment of Rhee as former chancellor of ...


The abrupt resignation of Cathleen Black as chancellor of New York City schools after only 95 days on the job serves as a cautionary tale for taxpayers. I'm not talking about Black's flagrant lack of educational experience, which has been extensively covered by the media. Instead, I'm talking about Mayor Michael Bloomberg's arrogant handling of the matter, which is emblematic of an even larger issue. From the time Bloomberg took office, he made education reform one of the pillars of his administration. He believed that business practices would transform the nation's largest school system. As a result, he ignored advice ...


The caveat that if something sounds too good to be true, it probably is has particular relevance to education. I'm talking specifically about parental choice of schools. I've long supported the policy, but at the same time I've cautioned about expecting too much from it. New York City, home of the nation's largest school district, serves as a cautionary tale. According to the Department of Education, waiting lists for elementary school for the fall semester are longer than they were last year ("Kindergarten Waiting Lists Get Longer," New York Times, Mar. 30). There are 3,195 children who find themselves ...


In a 5-4 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court on April 4 held that state tax credits for donations to organizations offering scholarships for private schools, including religious schools, do not violate the First Amendment's establishment clause ("Supreme Court upholds tax break for Arizona religious schools," Los Angeles Times, Apr. 5). The ruling in Arizona Christian School Tuition Organization v. Winn is another step in weakening the separation of church and state, no matter how it is being rationalized. To understand why requires stepping back to 1997 when Arizona allowed private citizens to set up charitable organizations known as school ...


In the midst of the debate about how to identify the best teachers and reward them, it's easy to forget that students themselves can be reliable judges. A study of six urban school districts by Thomas Kane of Harvard University found a strong correlation between student perception of teacher quality and student academic growth ("Too much jargon, too few fixes," Boston Globe, Mar. 22). Within the last week or so, former students have weighed in on this subject. Now a famous novelist, Marie Myung-Ok Lee pays tribute to her high school English teacher who recognized her latent talent and encouraged ...


When students get out of control and make the news, it's inevitable that a vocal group of fed-up taxpayers want to bring back corporal punishment. But despite widespread belief, paddling never went away. It is still permitted in 20 states, according to the Center for Effective Discipline. Granted this number is miniscule compared to a quarter of a century ago when all but a few states allowed its use, but it is still significant. The question is whether there isn't a better way of addressing the issue of unacceptable behavior. The latest focus is Witchita Falls, Texas, where an 11th ...


When I received word that my op-ed about merit pay for teachers was accepted for publication in The Guardian (London), I eagerly looked forward to the reaction of readers in order to see if their views would be different from readers' views here on the same subject ("No merit in merit pay for teachers," Mar. 27). Based on the first 181 comments posted as I write this column, however, there is a remarkable similarity. What emerges is the belief on the part of most readers that any attempt to explain is seen as an attempt to excuse. This same reaction ...


With so much attention focused on the need to graduate more students in STEM, it's disheartening to learn how the first "S" in the acronym is being undermined. The results of a survey of more than 900 public high school biology teachers published in the Jan. 28 issue of Science found that only 28 percent consistently follow the recommendations by the National Research Council to teach evolution. Contrary to popular belief, teachers who most enthusiastically support creationism are scattered across the country. This data are deep cause for concern. Biology is science, not religion. Although federal courts have ruled time ...


The opinions expressed in Walt Gardner's Reality Check are strictly those of the author(s) and do not reflect the opinions or endorsement of Editorial Projects in Education, or any of its publications.

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