February 2011 Archives

This is the kind of blocking and tackling teaching that makes a huge difference for boys, as John Merrow explains in this Huffpo analysis....


In Quebec, there's a lot of worry about what's the wrong answer for the boy troubles, but not as much thought about the right answer. And btw, what/who/where is a CSQ?...


Slate writer describes what I found several years ago when I visited James Madison University in Virginia. Once a college campus swings more than 60 percent female, everything changes, especially the balance of power between the sexes. What's true in the animal kingdom holds true among humans as well: the gender in short supply sets the dating/sex rules. It's elementary, really. And not very appetizing for the women on campus, who often face the choice of either slutting it up or removing themselves entirely from the 'competition'. Turns out it's not so great for the guys, either, at least ...


That's the advice to Korean mothers of boys. Sherman Dorn helpfully added this tool....


Kauffman's Ben Wildavsky, author of The Great Brain Race, always does first class research, and that's apparent in his new Foreign Policy piece about the hyped international competition we're supposed to be losing. It's a good reality check for writers like me who cite that competition in lamenting the fact that fewer males are lining up at the starting line (by earning college degrees). Actually, this doesn't change my mind about the need for men to earn degrees beyond high school, but it tempers the international aspect of that argument....


Helen Smith writing in Pajamasmedia. From the piece: I read Kay Hymowitz's new book, Manning Up: How the Rise of Women Has Turned Men into Boys, recently. First, the good points: Hymowitz does acknowledge that women have made great strides in our society mainly due to advances in technology and the knowledge economy that gives better jobs to those with degrees, degrees that "take years." Hymowitz has a good chapter titled "The New Girl Order" in which she admits that Americans now like girls better than boys. She does a fair job of describing some of the biases against boys, ...


I've referred before to Kay Hymowitz's new book, Manning Up, but this book merits yet another mention. I have long maintained that the social implications of the gender imbalances are the most significant and long lasting. Just check out the "marriageable mate" section in my Categories library. Here's a nice sample that ran in the WSJ....


This is one of the most under-reported stories in the country. In Britain, where are gender gaps are mirrored, the declining fortunes of working class whites is a top story. But not in this country. The Washington Post today contributes some valuable polling data about this group, one of the most pessimistic in the country. From the article: A mere 10 percent of whites without college degrees say they are satisfied with the nation's current economic situation. Most - 56 percent - say the country's best days are in the past, and more, 61 percent, say it will be a ...


Coming up April 6 at the New York Academy of Medicine. The featured speakers: * Gordon E. Finley, PhD, Professor of Psychology at Florida International University. His presentation will describe how emerging current realities and anticipated future trends will affect the role of fathers in families and children's lives. * Michael Gilbert, author of "The Disposable Male" and a senior fellow at the Annenberg Center for the Digital Future at the University of Southern California. He will speak on the current muddled state of gender affairs. * Dr. Paul Nathanson, PhD senior researcher, and Dr. Katherine Young, PhD, professor, both of the McGill ...


Really?...


David, can't you publish weekly rather than monthly? This is too valuable a resource to come around only once a month. Just work harder! Really, sleep is greatly overrated....


Confusing Ignorance with Illiteracy....


Kay Hymowitz explores her Manning Up themes in the WSJ. It all comes down to the marriageable mate issue. From the article: So where did these pre-adults come from? You might assume that their appearance is a result of spoiled 24-year-olds trying to prolong the campus drinking and hook-up scene while exploiting the largesse of mom and dad. But the causes run deeper than that. Beginning in the 1980s, the economic advantage of higher education--the "college premium"--began to increase dramatically. Between 1960 and 2000, the percentage of younger adults enrolled in college or graduate school more than doubled. In ...


Hanna Rosin, who wrote the "End of Men" cover story in The Atlantic, explores the growing number of women who out earn their husbands. To me, the relevant part of this trend lies in the marriage formation stage, better known as the "marriageable mate" dilemma. How many women choose not to marry because they can't find a similarly educated male mate? And what does this mean when those women have babies on their own?...


Not clear how this would affect the number of boys diagnosed, but just about anything would be an improvement over current methods....


Movie urges boys of color to look beyond basketball and rap music....


Regardless of what you believe causes the gender gap in pay, this is a pretty amazing chart, reproduced by The New York Times....


I included career academies in my book. Another profile here, which indicates the appeal to boys....


Valerie Strauss from the Washington Post is on target here. And it goes without saying who is most lacking in those reading/writing skills....


Catchy phrase out of Australia, where a columnist explores why boys are more likely than girls to receive medication for ADHD....


Useful discussion captured at Inside Higher Education about how to measure college success -- a debate that needs to focus on gender issues (but usually doesn't)....


What if "disparate impact" went beyond the disproportionate number of males punished? How about academic outcomes by gender?...


Take a look at the Demos project in Britain. We have mirror problems, but they are way ahead of us in trying to deal with them....


The most interesting part is that involves boys at elite private schools....


Interesting piece in Daily Beast about how this plays out in private schools....


Why don't we see more daily newspaper coverage of the boy troubles in this country? The gender gap differences between the U.S. and Britain are minute, and yet these stories are routine there. Okay, well, I'm supposed to know something about that, considering my background. But I really don't. You can't blame the national feminist organizations. By my reckoning, they have removed themselves from this battlefield. Why protest when maintaining silence achieves their goal of blocking boy-friendly strategies that they think might disadvantage girls (not true, but that's what they think)? Smart move on their part. My only explanation ...


A hand-wringing discussion. Truth is, once you set aside the poverty/single-parent family issues, this all comes down to a value-added debate. Some cities do a better or worse job adding educational value for identical populations. What's striking about Rochester is that despite years of winning acclaim for various flavors of school "reform," the city's schools remain comparatively worse. And that's because school reform usually judged by how adults compromise, not how students perform. I'm speaking as a former newspaper reporter in Rochester....


From Bloomberg Businessweek: Feb. 10 (Bloomberg) -- Women in the U.S. are almost twice as likely as men to earn a bachelor's degree by age 23, underscoring decades of gains by females in schools and the workforce, according to a government survey....


The Boys Initiative has launched. Take it for a test drive. Or, go directly to the press release. I'm honored to serve as an unpaid advisor. Don't worry, there are plenty of advisors with doctorates to offset my journalistic credentials....


Considering that violent video games often get blamed for boys' indifference toward school, this piece from PBSparents is worth a read....


That was a joke back in the days when I was on the launch/startup of USA Today, which loved, and I mean loved, to call trends. Thanks for Jonathan Wolfer for spotting this article from Denver on male elementary school teachers. At first, I thought I skimmed the article too quickly, looking for the trend data to substantiate that, in fact, more males are teaching at the elementary school level. Well, at this school there's a trend! Would it make a difference if, suddenly, more males streamed back into the teaching profession. Yes, but only at the margins. The ...


Thanks to Mark Sherman for spotting this article on holding kids back, especially boys. What is not dealt with in this article is what I'm told is an emerging problem, which is bullying by red shirted boys. They're just so much bigger than the other boys and for some boys, the temptation is too much....


Here's another perspective in Education Week....


Interesting study from the National Marriage Project. I'll summarize:the biggest impact was on those with the least academic attainment. What the "great recession" did was accelerate a gender trend already well under way. My prediction: In the coming years, the "marriageable mate" dilemma will become a routinely discussed and written-about issue....


In schools like this, you don't need to separate boys and girls to get great results from inner city males. I found the same in my book research. I'm not saying single-sex schools are a mistake ... just saying they're not the only path....


Interesting to compare the differences between Tunisia and the U.S. Here, the problem lies with under-educated males. Tom Friedman weighs in today....


This says as much about what passes as "scientific" research as it does about differences between men and women. But, if you haven't had your morning laugh yet.......


A little off the subject for this blog, but an interesting piece in USA Today by Christina Hoff Sommers....


Too many students being launched into four-year colleges? That's an easy argument to make. What's not so easy is to focus on the real deficit, which is preparing K-12 students for the inevitable post-high school training they will need. Forget the four-year argument. RiShawn Biddle adds his best to the debate....


There are some relevant insights about boys' education in this Washington Post piece. There's a push everywhere to tailor high school education more to job needs. The real issue, though, is tailoring high school education to the now-required post high school education needs....


Apparently, the foundations sponsoring this prize to increase college attainment don't realize there's a low-hanging-fruit path to boosting those numbers quickly: men. That's the group entering college at lower rates and then graduating at lower rates. This could be a good (and lucrative) project for the newly re-launched Boys Initiative to take on. Wait, I once wrote on this topic. Feel free to borrow ideas at will. If you win using my advice, you owe me lunch....


They're right. But solving this issue goes way beyond getting more black teachers into the classroom....


Separate the sexes and allow them to pursue reading/math skills on different time lines. In later grades, the skills levels merge....


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