This is one of the more interesting gender gaps "favoring" males (who end up paying a huge price)....


Given the higher education imbalances, this is an issue worth thinking about....


Gender gaps among Hispanics looking a lot like the gaps seen among African Americans and, increasingly, among blue collar whites....


Thousands of nothing-to-lose males neglected by an education system and facing no job prospects in a society where the richer keep getting richer and poor keep getting poorer. That's the situation in Britain ... and the U.S. Some essays that explore the anger, in the Chronicle and Washington Post....


Sex selection has created a society with 119 males for every 100 females, a predictor for social instability....


Chronicle commentary on the Summer Leadership Development Institute at Cheyney University....


Current Atlantic cover story, Can the Middle Class be Saved?, expertly lays out the special economic dilemma facing men. Especially compelling are the sections about the social implications: In a national study of the American family released late last year, the sociologist W. Bradford Wilcox wrote that among "Middle Americans"--people with a high-school diploma but not a college degree--an array of signals of family dysfunction have begun to blink red. "The family lives of today's moderately educated Americans," which in the 1970s closely resembled those of college graduates, now "increasingly resemble those of high-school dropouts, too often burdened by ...


I was resisting making the connection, but it is clearly there. Read the lead anecdote in this Times story. He learned to read only three years ago. Never held a job. In the Washington Post, columnist Courtland Milloy makes an interesting link between the flash mob of bankers and the flash mob of unemployable young males....


From the article: "The question always must be: What are you trying to accomplish with separating the students and how will you do it?" St. John's University law professor Rosemary C. Salamone told The New York Times in 2009. "If you don't do it thoughtfully, you run the risk of reinforcing stereotypes and playing to students' weaknesses."...


Important new book about digital literacy reviewed by a Times columnist. The book is Now You See It. From the Amazon description: A digital innovator shows how we can thrive in the new technological age. When Cathy Davidson and Duke University gave free iPods to the freshman class in 2003, critics said they were wasting their money. Yet when students in practically every discipline invented academic uses for their music players, suddenly the idea could be seen in a new light-as an innovative way to turn learning on its head. This radical experiment is at the heart of Davidson's inspiring ...


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