They need to be raised....


The two writers who lead the 'pushback' movement -- arguing that the boy troubles are mostly a myth -- avoid the issue of boys (relatively) lagging in school in this Edweek discussion of gender stereotypes....


Of course not, if college is defined by a four-year university degree. That's the point that's missing in this essay arguing that college isn't for everyone. Of course it isn't, and of course there are jobs that don't require college degrees. But jobs that require some kind of post-secondary work are on the rise, and not preparing students for that reality would be a mistake....


More women need to major in STEM subjects and pursue careers in those areas, argues the department. Given the gender imbalances on college campuses, the department is right....


In community colleges, especially students in their 20's....


This Brookings paper brings together all the factors that explain the declining economic status of men. Thanks to Christina Hoff Sommers for spotting this one....


Perhaps not. Perhaps just the opposite, says Penn State education professor Allison Carr-Chellman. From the article: University Park, Pa. -- Studies during the past decade have shown elementary school boys are struggling -- falling behind academically while also being diagnosed with learning disabilities and getting in trouble at school at far greater rates than girls. One answer to the problem, says a Penn State education professor, may be video games. "Instructional technology is my field, thinking about how to adopt technology properly in classrooms," said Alison Carr-Chellman, department head and professor of instructional systems in Penn State's College of Education. "One...


Paul Otellini does a great job laying out the case for boosting the number of engineering graduates in the U.S., but neglects to mention that the college gender gaps are a big player here. College enrollments soared while engineering majors sagged because the boom in college enrollment came from women, who mostly shun engineering majors. That fact also underlies the gender salary gaps....


The mayor puts $30 million of his own money into a program designed to help young black and Latino males. From the Politico article: The money will go toward the Young Men's Initiative, a three-year public-private partnership aimed at reshaping how the city interacts with about 315,000 men between the ages of 16 and 24. It's being billed as the "boldest and most comprehensive effort to tackle the broad disparities slowing the advancement of black and Latino young men" in the country, Bloomberg's office said in a statement. The program will offer job placement services, fatherhood classes, and training ...


For an apolitical look at the gender salary gap issue, examine the gender imbalances in science and math majors. This from Inside Higher Education: The U.S. Department of Commerce released new data on Wednesday on the gender gap in science and technology fields -- stressing the economic impact on women. The study noted that women hold almost half of all jobs in the United States, but less than 25 percent of those in STEM fields. This trend continues even though women in STEM jobs earn 33 percent more, on average, than do women in other fields. And the data ...


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