An issues that affects boys more than girls gets aired in the LA Times....


From Bluewater Productions. From their press release: COMICS IN THE CLASSROOM; BLUEWATER UNVEILS LESSON PLANS FOR EDUCATORS There was a time that reading a comic book in class was a one-way ticket to detention. However, as educators seek new and innovative ways to inspire learning and comprehension, publisher Bluewater Productions takes the next step in unveiling a series of multi-discipline lesson plans that incorporate graphic novels and, yes, comic books. Developed in partnership with educator and driving force behind the popular resource "The Graphic Classroom" Chris Wilson, educators and librarians can access a free and fully developed lesson plan that ...


Results from England's national test....


From the Edweek story on Baltimore: Baltimore recently has gained attention for cutting its dropout rate in half in just three years and actually bringing students back into school. Specifically, Maryland's state department of education reports that the Baltimore district's dropout rate declined from 9.37 percent in the 2006-07 school year to 4.07 percent in 2009-10. Middle school absences have dropped significantly, as well. Suspensions are part of that story. Three years ago, the school district handed out suspensions liberally to deal with a challenging student population that often performs well below grade level. In the 2006-07 school ...


Kay Hymowitz, author of Manning Up, offers up a lively analysis of the salary gender gap....


From the article: Department of Education research shows 70 percent of students getting D's and F's are boys. 80 percent of high school dropouts are too, and the same percentage of those with behavioral problems are boys. Studies say boys mature more slowly than girls, and learn in different ways. There's the age-old argument that boys are distracted enough by girls that it interrupt learning. Dallas officials looked at the success of the Irma Rangel all-girls school - rated exemplary every year since it opened - and said if it works for girls, why not for boys? Kendell Keeter's daughter ...


Developing a love of reading on a broad scale may be mission impossible, argues this Chronicle commentator....


Clever headline to an amusing look at gender differences, laid out in an Economist book review....


Some boys do fine with neither, this writer points out. Besides, women haven't been entirely successfully at translating their superior academic achievements into workforce achievements....


Sounds like an oxymoron, right? Anything but. What started in Maryland is spreading. Boys love it. The strategy: Around fifth or sixth grade you make the pivot into chapter books....


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