This is likely to be the new civil rights challenge, and it affects mostly boys. From the New York Times: Raising new questions about the effectiveness of school discipline, a report scheduled for release on Tuesday found that 31 percent of Texas students were suspended off campus or expelled at least once during their years in middle and high school -- at an average of almost four times apiece. When also considering less serious infractions punished by in-school suspensions, the rate climbed to nearly 60 percent, according to the study by the Council of State Governments, with one in seven ...


In prison....


Sociologist Victor Rios revisits in his childhood in Punished: Policing the Lives of Black and Latino Boys . From the Chronicle of Higher Education: With Punished, Rios joins an expanding cadre of social scientists who lament the directions that juvenile justice has taken in the United States in recent decades. He argues that in an era when the United States has achieved world-record levels of incarceration, of young people as well as adults, the widespread adoption of severe, hastily adopted get-tough-on-crime policies in the 1980s and 1990s has gone hand in hand with the vilification and persecution of black and Latino ...


The Initiative produces a draft of its strategic plan. And then this news. From the website: On June 24 Dennis Barbour, The Boys Initiative EVP, participated in a day-long White House meeting on community-based initiatives The meeting was called to brief community leaders on various Administration efforts and to obtain their input on the White House's plans going forward. Numerous White House and agency officials participated in the discussions, which included a visit from President Obama. Attendees included leaders from local and national organizations that provide community based services. The White House is planning a number of follow-up activities to ...


If women are going to make up nearly 60 percent of the undergraduate body, why are female professors and deans still in the minority? My assumption all along has been that the gender shift will take place. Replacement takes time. In some colleges, such as the University of Richmond, that shift has already taken place. Interesting that this is one of the colleges identified by U.S. News as favoring men in the admissions process, an attempt to keep campus gender balances in check....


The nation must add 20 million postsecondary-educated workers to the economy by 2025, according to a new Lumina report....


What the article doesn't include are the gender breakdowns on the students who elected to compete for the honor. That's where this issue gets interesting. What I've observed in other competitions is that girls are more motivated. The movement launched 15 years ago to steer more girls into upper level math and science classes has paid off. I have yet to hear a coherent argument explaining why we can't do the same for boys in reading and writing skills. There's no evidence that girls would be harmed in the process....


I have no problem with Title IX hovering over gender equity in sports. Maybe, just maybe, one day the feds will take a look at academic gender inequities, with far fewer boys arriving in their senior year prepared and motivated to take on college work....


Not so much, it turns out....


If you want to achieve the nation's higher education goals you have to look at boosting the performance of boys. Australians are far ahead of Americans in looking at their K-12 gender gap problems, but not enough to matter in the ultimate outcomes....


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