That's the rough headline of a long-ago-published USA Today article that triggered much derision. That theme, boys and girls are different, as in, they learn in different ways, is the topic of a series of articles in The Tennessean....


First, as this Slate article points out, women have fared far better than men in the Great Recession. The gender difference favoring men has unfolded in the tepid recovery, where more men than women have found jobs. Is the answer as simple as more construction jobs returning? Doubtful. Some interesting theories aired here. Which jobs are coming and going? The WSJ explains here....


This issue matters a lot to those (mostly men) trying to cope with a rapidly changing workforce....


The decline of single-sex schools leaves boy exposed to a feminized curriculum and a paucity of male teachers, says the head of the City of London School. From the article: Speaking ahead of the event, Mr Levin said: "We believe that there's a problem across the English speaking world with boys' academic underachievement. The education system is not giving them a good deal. We need some serious research into the pedagogical differences between teaching boys and girls to raise awareness of the fact that boys respond differently." And the Eton headmaster weighs in on the same topic. From his column: ...


That means problems for boys who have found that to be their best option....


Not just for the rich and religious -- also for floundering boys....


The figures wouldn't look any different in this country....


As in, why are middle schools so much more mature than middle school boys (physically, not just socially)? Interesting, but it doesn't explain the relatively recent shift in academic accomplishment we've seen along gender lines....


What's new in this front page Washington Post story isn't that hiring is picking up faster for men. That's been clear for months. What's new is the anecdotal evidence of men beginning to apply for positions traditionally held by women. If the recent "mancession" truly has proven capable of influencing behavior by men, will we now see an uptick in the percentage of men earning college degrees?...


A commentary out of Kansas City arguing that while single sex schools might be helpful for girls, the boys need to go first....


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