The gender gaps in the U.K. seem roughly equivalent to what we're seeing here. The difference is the extent of the awareness. Overseas, the story makes regular appearances in the news. Here, the subject is still considered somewhat exotic -- and controversial. The latest from England: Figures published today by the Department for Education show that girls perform better in every area of early development, including reading, communicating, basic numeracy, social skills and physical awareness. According to statistics, four-in-10 boys cannot write a simple shopping list or a letter to Santa, compared with just a fifth of girls. A ...


The debate over video distractions is far from over. The New York Times summarizes the latest from researchers: From the article: "I like to call it secondhand TV," said Dr. Brown, who is the lead author of the guidelines. Studies cited in the guidelines say that parents interact less with children when the television is on, and that a young child at play will glance at the TV -- if it is on, even in the background -- three times a minute. "When the TV is on, the parent is talking less," Dr. Brown said. "There is some scientific evidence ...


Note: This is a guest post by John Michael Lee Jr., PhD., policy director for the Advocacy and Policy Center in the Advocacy, Government Relations and Development unit at the College Board. This past weekend I was a part of taking 19 African American and Latino youth on a college tour to visit Syracuse University and Lemoyne College in Syracuse New York. The young high school students were from schools throughout New York City, and each of them are a part of the Alpha G.E.N.T.S. mentoring program that is operated by the Kappa Xi Lambda Chapter ...


The New York Times is running a forum on single sex education, pegged to the Science article calling the rationale behind the movement "pseudoscience." All the major players were invited to join in. Another spinoff from the freshly charged debate is this take-no-prisoners editorial from the Delaware County Times. Remove single sex as an option? Forget about it, argues the editorial page, which also takes a few jabs at Janet Hyde, a Science co-author and Leonard Sax's debating partner during a National Public Radio segment on the issue. (My evergreen comment on the debate: When everyone discovers that single sex ...


This is worthy of imitation in the United States, and not just for boys. It would give students a clear career goal before finishing high school. From the Washington Post article: The skills gap that troubles Japan is tormenting the United States. Since 2000, the percentage of U.S. young adults ages 20 to 24 with jobs has fallen from 74 percent to 62 percent, a level not seen since the 1930s, according to a 2011 study by Harvard University's Graduate School of Education. It concluded that the "college for all" system that emerged in the United States after World ...


Note: This is a guest post by John Michael Lee Jr., PhD., policy director for the Advocacy and Policy Center in the Advocacy, Government Relations and Development unit at the College Board. When I look at the challenges that are facing young men of color in this country, it would be impossible to explore the problems that exist with young men of color in both high school and college without exploring the concepts of identities and masculinities. Every time I hear the males of color speak as if they are verbally challenged and with the deepest voice possible, I am ...


Update: Single sex dealt a legal setback in Louisiana. A radio show with Leonard Sax debating one of the authors of the Science article claiming the science behind separating the sexes is "pseudoscience." And AEI's Christina Hoff Sommers steps in to debate the future of single sex education. And an interesting dissent from a University of Texas professor. Don't miss the slap at psychologists. From the piece by Sommers: What do the data say about the pros and cons of single-sex schools? When the Department of Education carried out a systematic review in 2005, it found a muddle of contradictory ...


Note: This is a guest post by John Lee, policy director for the Advocacy and Policy Center in the Advocacy, Government Relations and Development unit at the College Board. Within a generation, the College Board reports, the United States will be a much more diverse nation. In fact, no racial or ethnic group will be a majority in less than half a century, the board says. The fastest-growing populations in the country are those minority groups with the lowest levels of educational attainment—African-Americans, Hispanics, and Native-Americans. The data assures that if present levels of educational attainment and current population...


I've launched into a new book with a tight deadline (You might have thought I'd avoid that, given that the Michelle Rhee book, The Bee Eater, turned into a crash production after Mayor Fenty lost his bid for another term .... but no). To free up time for book research and writing I have invited several guest bloggers to step in with their thoughts on the boy troubles. Most of the guest bloggers will focus on minority males, the area everyone agrees is a very serious problem. That emphasis is especially relevant now that Congress is debating the renewal of No ...


Hanna Rosin racked up an Atlantic Magazine hot seller with her, End of Men, soon to become a book. Why stop there? This month the Atlantic gets down to the nitty gritty question everyone wants answered: What does this mean for me? Am I going to land a similarly educated husband? Short answer: Maybe. All but new readers of this blog know that the "marriageable mate" dilemma has long been my forecast of the most significant impact arising from the gender gaps. (Check the categories section of this blog and you'll find a library of information on this issue.) For ...


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