Note the special impact on boys....


An essay on problematic males in the Chronicle (may need password)....


Experts gather to discuss this problem: Today, many of the 3.5 million Black boys under the age of nine will not enter the pipeline to college and successful adulthood. More than 40 percent of Black children are born into poverty. Poor Black children are behind in cognitive development at nine months and further behind at 24 months. By kindergarten, poor Black children have to beat the odds to catch up -- and as test results show, many never do. Among the solutions offered: * The link between early brain development and later academic achievement. * The success of early childhood home ...


One school's approach to solving the boy troubles....


More female doctors is something to applaud. A lot more female politicians, entrepreneurs and scientists -- fields women often avoid -- would be something to celebrate. But there are drawbacks to any social revolution. In the veterinarian field, the impact of the feminization of the field is an acute shortage of large animal vets. As this op-ed in the Times points out, there's a little noticed parallel downside in medicine....


Kevin Carey writing with his usual insight in The New Republic....


The graduation rates are terrible, in part because of the gender gaps in graduation: Boys fared much worse than girls in the Education Week numbers, with just 39.6 percent of Nevada's male high school students graduating in 2008, the most recent year for which figures were available for all states. Female students graduated at a rate of 50.1 percent. The national averages were 74.7 percent for girls and 67.7 percent for boys. The numbers steadily declined by ethnicity, with black students in Nevada having a 33 percent graduation rate and Hispanics at 29.6 percent. White ...


From Tampa....


Dan Willingham doesn't single out boys in this piece, but that's probably not necessary. We know who needs the most "self regulation" in the classroom....


Arne Duncan schedules a visit to a charter school in D.C. and praises Watch D.O.G.S., a program to encourage fathers to volunteer at schools. From the DOE press release: U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan will encourage fathers and father figures to become more involved in education at a Watch D.O.G.S. program taking place at Two Rivers Public Charter School on Monday, June 13, 2011. Duncan will be joined by Principle Maggie Bello and Watch D.O.G.S. coordinator Eric Snow. He will tour the school and discuss the importance of ...


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