Hollywood expands on an existing theme: men are wimps, at least compared to the more successful and assertive women surrounding them. WSJ does a nice sum-up: Studio and network executives say that this year they heard more pitches than ever before for shows about the changing dynamics of men. "Manliness is under assault," says Todd Holland, executive producer of "Free Agents." "That's the premise." Some call the trend "wussification" or "feminization." Others say it's just wimpy guys who want to be macho and have no clue how to do it. But it's subtler than that....


Now, women are taking more of a hit, argues this writer....


Interestingly, math seems to be the issue....


Interesting discussion of pollutants as possible triggers. As for the gender differences, with four times as many boys as girls suffering from autism, we've always known that male infants are far more vulnerable....


This time from Montreal. But, as David Chadwell points out in a comment, the boys experiment was still considered a success....


The 'debate' over whether all students need a four-year degree seems somewhat pointless. Of course they don't. But given the number of jobs that will require post-secondary work, it seems clear that high schools are not doing a good job preparing students for that reality. At some community colleges the remediation rate rises as high as 80 percent....


The Foundation for Male Studies has a plan: According to the US Census Bureau, more women are going to college today than they did a decade ago while the percentage of men attending college is decreasing relative to women. The number of females enrolling in college after high school increased by 20 percent from 1967 to 2000, while the number of men has decreased by 4 percent. This, combined with women graduating at a significantly higher rate than men, currently result in 1.5 million more women than men graduating from college each year. The psychological and sociological consequences of ...


Sounds like an interesting school, with 96 percent of the graduating seniors headed to college, most of them four-year colleges. Stories like this, however, rarely get into the important qualifiers: How representative of the neighborhoods was the original class of ninth graders and how many of those ninth graders dropped out before the senior year? Regardless of those qualifiers, one thing is guaranteed. Those young men would not have fared this well in regular Philadelphia high schools....


This could increase the appeal to men....


Readers of this blog know that I've been collecting anecdotal reports suggesting that's the case. Here's some research indicating I might be right. More disturbing: The separate gender classes may be bad for boys. Thanks to Dan Willingham for spotting this one....


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