That's the argument Christina Hoff Sommers makes in the Chronicle....


Nice column in DesMoines Register: -- In academic achievement rates: 34 percent of women have a bachelor's degree by age 34 compared to 27 percent of men. At Iowa State University in 2004, 75 percent of women but only 67 percent of men who started six years earlier graduated. The other two public universities have similar gaps. Women in general also have higher grade point averages and are more likely to go to graduate school. -- From the unemployment rolls: Nationally, about 35 percent of men age 25 to 54 without a high school diploma are not working. The unemployment ...


In the Times: the Blue-Collar recession....


Nice profile of a Catholic school shutting down....


A possible Austin experiment in single-sex education. From the article: Carstarphen said boys in the district academically lag behind their female counterparts. She said the gaps are larger among those from low-income families. Among other statistics, district officials offered data showing that in 2009, 73 percent of boys graduated, compared with 78 percent of girls. On average, 41.8 percent of boys in 2010 were among the top 10 students in their high school class....


New York Times profiles an interesting program....


At least this school district is making an effort, which, unfortunately, makes it unique. Even asking the question -- what is it that causes boys to disengage from school? -- is impressive. From the article: Milford, which has been exploring gender issues districtwide has examined six years of academic and discipline data. What they learned has sparked more questions. Since Milford boys perform similarly to the girls on state achievement tests, and more boys than girls are identified as gifted in elementary school, then why are there fewer boys in AP classes in high school? "It's one of the questions ...


Good idea, especially considering the gender imbalances favoring women in the student body. Soon, perhaps, the AFT will produce a report on promoting gender diversity among students. That would be interesting, especially since they represent so many K-12 teachers. Why is it that so many more girls than boys arrive at their senior prepared and motivated to take on college work?...


Good background on the group challenging schools to do more for boys....


Boys need to get a faster start learning, and yet boys are less likely to mature fast enough to adjust to preschool classrooms. Here's the dilemma playing out in Connecticut....


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