In the New York Times Sunday Magazine Larry Summers is asked about the economic scenario that keeps him up. His answer: the 20 percent of working age men, 25-54, who aren't working. Even with an economic recovery that's likely to improve only to one in six, he said. Why is that a problem? Larry's answer: There's consequences for poverty. It has consequences for the government's disability budget, crime, the ways in which children are raised....


That's the position taken by Rep. Duncan Hunter, chairman of the House Education and the Workforce subcommittee, which oversees K-12 federal programs. The Equity program would be one of 43 programs trimmed by Hunter to "reduce the fat" in the federal education budget. The subcommittee's rationale is interesting: ● Women's Educational Equity: The Women's Educational Equity program promotes education equity for women and girls. The program received $1.8 million in FY 2008 and $2.4 million in both FY 2009 and 2010. Funding for the program was eliminated in the final FY 2011 budget agreement and the president's FY 2012 ...


New York Times prints some interesting letters in response to the David Brooks column about the 20 percent of working-age men who have disappeared from the economic radar screen....


That's the operating philosophy at this single-sex school in South Carolina. Funny, I once visited Princeton's vaunted Institute for Advanced Study and failed to notice the male scholars bouncing off the walls. Maybe I came at the wrong time of day....


Way is author of Deep Secrets, another book that takes a look at the "boy code" said to limit boys' emotional ranges. Sign up here. You could win a free book! From the press release: Drawing from hundreds of interviews conducted throughout adolescence with black, Latino, white, and Asian American boys, Deep Secrets reveals the ways in which we have been telling ourselves a false story about boys, friendships, and human nature. Boys' descriptions of their male friendships sound more like "something out of Love Story than Lord of the Flies." Yet in late adolescence, boys feel they have to "man...


Interesting pieces, especially the connection to the declining education attainment of American males. From the article: A second explanation is that American men have let their schooling slide. Those aged between 25 and 34 are less likely to have a degree than 45- to 54-year-olds. As David Autor of MIT points out, they are also less likely to have completed college than their contemporaries in Britain, Denmark, France, Ireland, the Netherlands and Spain. In recent years America's university graduation rates have slipped from near the top of the world league to the middle. Men are far likelier than women to ...


Sponsored by Educational Testing Service, June 14, in Washington. From the press release: The symposium will concentrate on the following: * focus attention on the challenges, needs and opportunities facing young Black boys within the larger picture of black male achievement * illuminate the connections between early cognitive and social/emotional development and later readiness for success in school * examine the role of a high-quality, seamless PreK-3rd grade continuum of education in supporting black male achievement * identify promising, realistic policies and strategies to affect the path of the 3.5 million Black males under the age of 9...


Tom Mortenson updates his data on the state of boys and men in America in this press briefing by The Boys Initiative....


The Hechinger Report offers links to recent reporting, most of it weighing against the need for college. I see nothing that changes my position that college is the new high school. Students need some kind of post-secondary education to compete. A better way to frame the debate would be: Who actually needs a four-year degree?...


Great idea out of New Jersey. And learning to deal with the fart jokes is just part of life....


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