Advocates for single sex schooling, both educators and parents, are making their argument. In this article, we hear from some parents in Tampa: While some parents, like Leath, specifically sought out the single-gender option, others with students already enrolled at those east Tampa schools simply embraced the change. And they've seen a difference, too. Take Franklin eighth-grader Aaron Harper's mother said he still makes straight A's, just like last year. The difference now, without girls around, Aaron tells his mom: less "heckling" in the hallways so he stays focused. For Geralyn Leath, too, the benefits have extended beyond the classroom. "When...


Given that single sex schools appear to be the only policy solution currently on the table to stabilize the academic aspiration plateau we've seen among boys, the debate over the science -- or lack of science -- behind separating the sexes is an important one. David Chadwell, who oversees South Carolina's ambitious single sex program, weighs in with some personal thoughts. Definitely worth a read. One excerpt: 2a. Little Evidence of Academic Advantages. COMMENT First, single-gender education does not have to be better than coeducation. It shouldn't be worse though. This is why schools should conduct reviews of their programs. ...


Sax was singled out in the piece, which portrayed the logic behind single sex education as 'pseudoscience.' The piece is riddled with errors, says Sax: On September 23 2011, the journal Science published an article entitled "The Pseudoscience of Single-Sex Schooling." I received the prepublication galleys the first week of September 2011. On Monday September 5 2011, I sent an urgent e-mail to the senior editors at Science, informing them that the article "is filled with astonishing errors of fact which invalidate the main thrust of the article -- astonishing in that errors of fact of this mangitude usually ...


An ebook by Tavis Smiley to match his PBS special on the crisis facing black males is out: Too Important to Fail: Saving America's Boys. An article about both the book and TV series. From the Amazon description: Too Important to Fail: Saving America's Boys is the companion volume to TAVIS SMILEY REPORTS PBS special which is funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting as part of its American Graduate: Let's Make It Happen initiative. It examines an undeclared crisis in America--the staggering dropout rate among young black males. In countless urban schools the graduation rate has plummeted to less ...


This article could shift the debate on single sex education, which over the past several years has enjoyed wide support among educators. Due mostly to the declining academic performance of boys, school districts have been ramping up their single sex offerings. The strategy is based on the conventional wisdom that boys and girls learn in very different ways -- a notion that has come under increasing fire. Here's the NYT on the report. And here's the Washington Post's take on the Science article questioning the logic behind single sex education. It includes a response from single sex advocate Leonard Sax, ...


Then buckle up, because they are about to get steeper, according to projections from the U.S. Department of Education. A short just filed by the Chronicle of Higher Education: The Education Department's statistical arm has released a new forecast suggesting that total college enrollment will increase by 13 percent from 2009 to 2020. Enrollments are expected to grow the fastest for students age 25 to 34, at 21 percent, and enrollment for Hispanic students will increase by 46 percent. The report, from the National Center for Education Statistics, projects that enrollment for women will increase by 16 percent, doubling ...


That's the argument that Pink Brain, Blue Brain author Lise Eliot and coauthors make in Science. Here's a podcast version. Here's another take on the study from ABC. Write the coauthors: The strongest argument against SS education is that it reduces boys' and girls' opportunities to work together in a supervised, purposeful environment. When teachers make children's sex salient, students choose to spend less time interacting with other-sex peers (25). Even in coeducational schools, boys and girls spend considerable time with same-sex peers, which exaggerates sex-typed behaviors and attitudes. Boys who spend more time with other boys become increasingly aggressive (27),...


The one-on-one tutoring program aimed at young students who have fallen behind in reading -- and boys would dominate that group -- continues to proliferate. From their website: Growth Reading Partners strives to reach more children in need by expanding both within existing communities and to other high-need urban areas. Students Grown from 100 in 2003 to 1,928 in 2010-11 Growing to 2,800 in 2011-12 Volunteers Grown from 80 in 2003 to 2,888 in 2010-11 Growing to over 3,000 in 2011-12 California Partner Schools Grown from 1 in 1999 to 48 in 2011-12 Washington, D.C. ...


Slate reports that the side arguing men are finished won the debate at NYU, based on audience polling. From Slate: Rosin, the author of last summer's Atlantic cover story "The End of Men," used her opening statement to argue that men are through dominating because they've failed to adapt to a postmodern economy that places a higher premium on traditionally feminine attributes (consensus-building, social intuition, empathy, and communication skills). Men have narrow, inflexible ideas of what it means to be a man, and thus have pigeonholed themselves into dying industries. Women, on the other hand, are more flexible and malleable ...


The interesting study by Fordham Foundation on what happens to high achieving middle schoolers as they transition to high school (an alarming number take a performance dip) can be broken out by gender, as U.S. News shows. We already know that lower achieving boys suffer most during that transition, a phenomenon known as the 9th grade bulge. Now we know something similar happens at the top end. From U.S. News: Although minorities were underrepresented among high achievers, high-performing minorities tended to stay more stable than high-performing white students. Boys' performances suffered more often than girls' performances during the ...


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